clear

Darren Almond

Man in the Mirror (group show)
Vanhaerents Art Collection, 24 April 2014 - 28 October 2017

The Vanhaerents Art Collection is pleased to announce its third exhibition, entitled Man in the Mirror, which will be open to the public from May 3,2014 . For this presentation, the founder and patron of the collection – the former building contractor Walter Vanhaerents – joined forces with Emma Dexter, who in recent years has curated widely acclaimed shows forICAand Tate Modern.

Set to run for a period of three years, the exhibition Man in the Mirror features a selection of over 40 largescale works from the Vanhaerents Art Collection. On display are paintings, sculptures and installations that incorporate mirrors or reflecting materials, as well as artworks that hold a mirror up to the audience, encouraging introspection, critical self-awareness and reflective thought.

With a nod to the eponymous comedy film from 1936 and Michael Jackson’s famous song, this thematic exhibition extends over three floors. Combining recently created artworks with seminal, historical exponents of arte povera, Conceptualism and Neo-Geo, it covers a wide array of topics such as time and space, matter and mind, and individual and collective identity. Concurrently, it raises intricate questions about art, society and the human body. (press release Vanhaerents Art Collection)


Vanhaerents Art Collection, Brussels


Additional:

Darren Almond

Visions of Nature (group show)
Kunst Haus Wien Museum Hundertwasser, Vienna
13 September 2017 - 18 February 2018

Darren Almond, Fullmoon @Cerro Chalten, 2013 © Darren Almond, Courtesy White Cube Gallery
Darren Almond, Fullmoon @Cerro Chalten, 2013 © Darren Almond, Courtesy White Cube Gallery

Mankind’s relationship with nature is subject to continual change. But never before in our planet’s history have the changes caused by mankind’s impact on nature had such far-reaching repercussions as they do today. The exhibition has taken twenty-five artistic positions by international and Austrian artists working in the medium of photography and video to examine the way in which our relationship with nature is currently reflected from an artistic point of view. They address the theme of nature and the ways of representing and depicting nature against the backdrop of the Anthropocene, the first epoch in the Earth’s history to be shaped by mankind’s impact.

All the works are situated within the interplay between nature as a place of longing and nature as a resource, and anchored in the juxtaposition between vulnerable eco-system and a force of nature capable of enduring all. They demonstrate that the photographic depiction of nature and landscape as a construct shapes our perception of nature; they also illustrate the ways in which we human beings approach, and distance ourselves from, nature. The spectrum of works on show (ranging from Darren Almond to Anna Reivilä) also serves to highlight just how changeable our relationship with nature actually is. Nature is not a place that stands detached and aloof from cultural contexts; rather, nature and culture are inseparably linked.

Kunst Haus Wien Museum Hundertwasser, Vienna


Darren Almond, Charles Gaines et al.

Time as Landscape - Inquiries of Art and Science (group show)
Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park
29 September - 31 December 2017

Wonder. It is the experience of awe and inspiration; and also the action of questioning and seeking. Wonder – as experience and action – is cultivated mutually through science and art, and contemporary practices in both fields are more kindred than ever. In fact, their synergies have led in recent years to more overt cross-references and also fruitful and inventive collaborations between artists and scientists. The source of inspiration for this particular exhibition is a selection of artists who desire to understand, question and describe the subject of time: as scientific fact, as relative experience, as aesthetic archive.

The topic is timely as ongoing discussions of STEAM curriculum reverberate in our schools. The preciousness of time is also amplified by growing concerns about the environment and global mortality from a macro perspective to a micro vantage point as individuals struggle to make sense of a faster-paced, connected world where everything runs on the 24-hour news cycle.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum


Darren Almond

Tidalectics (group show)
TBA21 - Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Academy, Vienna
2 June - 19 November 2017

Darren Almond, A, 2002 (video still) Courtesy of Jay Jopling | White Cube. © Darren Almond
Darren Almond, A, 2002 (video still) Courtesy of Jay Jopling | White Cube. © Darren Almond

...like the movement of the ocean she’s walking on, coming from one continent/continuum, touching another, and then receding (‘reading’) from the island(s) into the perhaps creative chaos of the(ir) future... – Kamau Brathwaite

Tidalectics is an oceanic worldview, a different way of engaging with the oceans and the world we inhabit. Unbound by land-based modes of thinking and living, the exhibition is reflective of the rhythmic fluidity of water and the incessant swelling and receding of the tides.

TBA21–Academy’s first exhibition, Tidalectics, presents thirteen standout artists whose distinctive works cast oceanic perspectives on the cultural, political, and biological dimensions of the oceans, some examining the effects of human-made issues such as climate change and sea-level rise, and others reimagining human and “more-than-human” relationships. Tidalectics will comprise nine newly commissioned works, many flowing from the Academy’s expeditions in the Pacific Ocean, alongside exceptional pieces from the Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21) collection.

Taking its title from a play on words by the celebrated Barbadian poet-historian Kamau Braithwaite, Tidalectics seeks to comprehend our histories as trajectories tossed by waves, from ocean crossings to systems of exchange, myths, and microbial origins. The exhibition will highlight processes of cultural adaptation and material change, presenting a rich framework for understanding the coalescing polarities of contemporaneity and history, science and poetics, routes and roots, and ourselves—mostly land-dwelling humans—with the oceans and their many and diverse inhabitants.

Darren Almond’s video A (2002) from the TBA21 collection presents an Antarctic world of infinite whites devoid of human presence, accompanied by a sound track that alternates between dreamy serenity and blood-thumping menace.

TBA21, Vienna