Tursic & Mille

Selected Works

Cumshot in blue

2006
oil on canvas
200 x 300 cm.; 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in.

"The brutality of the paintings of Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille does not actually reside so much in their erotic, pornographic element as in their virtuoso and artisanal manufacture, which is also, incidentally, thoroughly erotic, where we are aware of the ballet involving the four hands and two bodies busily at work, painting, and patiently and ploddingly making the image. By once more making images, when we no longer need any, satisfied as we are with all the images and their fluid and instant circulation, and because it is these particular images Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille suffuse painting with a raison d'être that is all the more shocking because it runs counter to the day and age. In so doing, they move it forward in the only way that is, for the time being, possible: precisely by contrasting it with the triumphant imagery being produced (and disseminated) by other media."

E. Troncy, ‘This painting’, in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 36

The Back of the Sign

2007
oil and silver on canvas
200 x 300 cm.; 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in.

"They also paint the B-side of Hollywood, both figuratively and literally, with this canvas showing us the famous letters in the Hollywood Hills, seen from behind, something smacking of David Lynch, and Mulholland Drive, the flipside of dream and décor, something which can turn into a nightmare. It is a dream and at the same time they are just fragile, well-worn letters, hardly recognizable, scarcely meaningful, a dream which can catch fire, as in this other canvas which sets fire to the Hollywood Hills. The dream and its end, the life and death of images, their power, their presence, and their disappearance in the offing. Thanks to their painting, they rekindle the old dream, based on its remains and ruins; they help us to once more like images, and they reconcile us with them. Our eyes seem weary, they are once again ready for the spectacle, with much jubilation and at the same time a certain melancholy, a celebration of late-comers, arriving at a time when all films have already been seen, paintings reproduced, styles tried out, and yet things are still going on, and we still might be able to believe in it all..."

V. Vuillaume, 'Another Girl', in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 44

2h13'01'' Le Sacrifice A. Tarkovski

2007
oil on canvas
200 x 300 cm.; 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in.

"Perhaps there is a possible link here between the painting of girls and the paintings of landscapes and houses on fire: desire being set aflame, all-consuming but forever being reborn. These particular paintings are paintings of catastrophe, disaster, the end of the world, and the endgame. From desire to disaster, this might be the trajectory which takes us from the girls of Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille to their landscapes on fire. Desire leads to disaster, partly bound up with fiction but also with death and catastrophe. The fate of those who are in love with images is always tragic, desire always leads to disaster."

V. Vuillaume, 'Another Girl', in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 43

91 Interview May 1998

2008
oil on canvas
250 x 200 cm.; 98 3/8 x 78 3/4 in.

"The first Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille girl I saw was fair-haired, and lying in the grass. That month of May blonde had no name, she came from the May 1998 issue of the magazine Interview. As a rule, the Tursic-Mille girls are given the name of the magazine they are taken from. They are not subjects, they are images, just images. I first saw that fair-haired girl on a record sleeve, a first accidental, haphazard encounter. I immediately liked that rather vulgar blonde, looking at us all eyes, blue, needless to add, almost too blue, at once expressive and empty, disquieting. I do not know why I instantly liked that image, but I think it had to do with the fictious character of that blonde, she is so fake, she 'rings fake', the way we usually say 'rings true'. She is a fiction, a blonde of fiction, lovely as a lie, as a film image. It is the image of a blonde, and in a confused way knowing we are not quite sure what, we feel that this is an image based on another image. There is no use trying to make our way back to the source, to reality, it is too far away. This is what makes the image moving, its – her – fictional being, while, with the girl's gaze, it proclaims her presence. What troubles us is this impression of having already see this image, at once familiar and foreign, we have already seen it but not like this, not in painting."

V. Vuillaume, 'Another Girl', in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 43

Numéro p. 185

2008
UV ink on canvas
250 x 200 cm.; 98 3/8 x 78 3/4 in.

"These large abstract canvases reproduce the sheets of paper used by Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille to try out their colours as they actually make their figurative paintings; they are paintings involving chance and accident, which both summon up the great moments of abstract painting and also, in another chord, remind us that these paintings, which are so sure about their powers of seduction, are nothing more than assembled patches of colour, pure matter or paint, the spirit of which may run away after all."

V. Vuillaume, 'Another Girl', in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 44

Silver Girl

2010
oil and silver on canvas
200 x 300 cm.; 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in.

"In its patient construction, this art project seems to be wagering that each and every painting is an invention. Otherwise put, nothing will be repeated ad infinitum, and if the representations seem to be as one and form a continuous set, the headstrong eye will know how to observe the variation of techniques, the increasing complexity of procedures, their on-going experimentation, their abandonment and their resumption, in a nutshell a permanent laboratory-like work whose canvas is the place – and which, at times, leads to the total covering of a representation in colour by a layer of translucent grey (Silver Girl, 2010)."

E. Troncy, ‘This painting’, in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 35

The Windmill

2012
oil and silver on canvas
200 x 250 cm.; 78 3/4 x 98 3/8 in.

"Every technique is there, every possible touch, every style, sometimes on one and the same canvas, every conceivable manner of painting, and every angle. Every genre, too: portrait, landscape, abstraction, geometric shapes, optical experiments. These artists' canvases summon up the history of painting, but in a discreet way, the whole past of painting in all its forms, and they bring it into our present, the present of the Internet, where they find their image market, the market of film, advertising, and fashion magazines."

V. Vuillaume, 'Another Girl', in Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille: Decade, Dijon: Les Presses du réel, 2011, p. 43

Raw Bettie; La Bettie au Bichon; Bettie in Pink; Flesh Bettie; Doubtful Bettie; Bettie and the Duck; Blue Bettie; Bettie and sepia and black and white (from left to right, first to second row)

2017
oil on canvas
each painting: 220 x 165 cm.; 86 5/8 x 65 in.

The present eights paintings are based on images of the American pin-up girl Bettie Page. Tursic and Mille used for this series an image of her posing topless in a living room-like setting.

The works are characteristic examples of Ida Tursic and Wilfried Mille's engagement with today's forms of image representation. The artists find their anonymous pictorial material in magazines and the enormous data pool of the internet. They select pornographic images, film scenes of burning houses, landscapes as well as mere abstract elements as the basis, which is then transformed into the traditional domain of painting.

Alienated by overlapping layers of paint as well as parts that seem to be cut out of the underlying picture, the Bettie paintings deal with the manipulation, re-utilisation and disappearance of images, especially in the current age of endless visual data replication.

Installation view:
Paintings, Stiftung zur Förderung zeitgenössischer Kunst in Weidingen, Weidingen, 2017

Photo: def-image

La Nuit

2018
oil on canvas
200 x 250 cm.; 78 3/4 x 98 3/8 in.

La Nuit, 2018 depicts a volcanic soil under a starry sky with a bright, radiating moon which evokes the sun in a palette mainly consisting of hues of blue, yellow and brown. The horizon line guides the viewer’s eyes to the right-hand side of the landscape, where a small fire burns, as if blown leftwards on the painting’s surface by wind. The present painting draws its power from a more intuitive approach by the artists, and its inherent romanticism.