Louise Bonnet

Selected Works

The Pond

2018
oil on linen
244 x 203 cm.; 96 x 79 7/8 in.
Photo: Lee Tyler Thompson

“The earlier works played more nicely, contained stronger hints of illustrative qualities with nods to the likes of Guston or Saul. More recently, the paintings have begun to take on a much more muscular, minimal quality. The figures look more strained and uncomfortable, the limbs more contorted, the settings sparser and more starkly lit like the post-punk odes to Goya’s ‘Saturn Devouring His Son’. Or maybe some creature that Odysseus had to wage war with on that long and perilous road back to Ithaca.”


A. Nelson, ‘Exquisite Agonies: The Art of Louise Bonnet’, in Louise Bonnet, exh. cat., Los Angeles: Nino Mier Gallery, 2018, n.p.

The Finger

2018
oil on linen
244 x 203 cm.; 96 x 79 7/8 in.
Photo: Lee Tyler Thompson

“Bonnet started to use oils only recently, in 2014, and the medium turned out to be the perfect way to attain plasticity. Her painted figures possess solidity and stillness. They are abstract in the sense that they become placeholders for forces that play out across the canvas as a whole. The shades and folds of skin in The Finger, or the tears or waving hair in The Rock, were resolved in such a subtle and beautiful way that they resembled the lovingly described surfaces of objects in a classical still life. As a result, the sensations of discomfort, disproportion, imbalance, or pressure were transformed into something paradoxically celebratory. Bonnet’s paintings are weird in a serious and monumental way.”

J. Benschop, ‘Review of Louise Bonnet’, in Artforum, vol. 57, no. 6, February 2019

The Tube Socks

2016
oil on linen
101.6 x 76.2 cm.; 40 x 30 in.
Photo: Lee Tyler Thompson

"Bonnet’s is a world of pulsing, sometimes even grotesque exaggerations, where beings inhabit traits that fluctuate in a kind of gender-blended state. Often alone, sometimes with a counter-point, usually occupying the lion’s share of the composition, almost jammed within the framework of the canvas, with appendages acting more like geysers of feeling, manifesting from deep within. Think more beings functioning as psycho-emotional allegories wherein the inner agonies of plight emerge, baring themselves shamelessly for all the world to ponder."

A. Nelson, ‘Exquisite Agonies: The Art of Louise Bonnet’, in Louise Bonnet, exh. cat., Los Angeles: Nino Mier Gallery, 2018, n.p.