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Jeff Koons, Christopher Wool et al.

Pop Pictures People (group show)
Museum Brandhorst, Munich
30 June 2017 - 30 June 2018


Additional:

Christopher Wool

First Impressions: Prints from the Anderson Collection (group show)
de Young Museum, San Francisco
2 June - 8 December 2018

Our culture is full of discussions around managing the ever-important “first impression”—that first encounter with a new person, place, thing, or idea, when opinions are often hastily formed. It can be difficult to escape the grip of a “first.” However, artworks can provide artists, viewers, and collectors with multiple opportunities for first impressions—an expression particularly apt in printmaking, since every sheet bearing a printed image is called an impression. This exhibition casts a wide net across the concept of the “first impression” to present a selection of highlights from the museum’s Anderson Graphic Arts Collection.

Among the first impressions on view are examples of artists’ first projects at a print workshop, their debut of a motif or technique, and their initial works within a series. Viewing artwork likewise provides occasions for firsts. There is the first time a viewer encounters a work of art, which is also perhaps their earliest exposure to the artist or to a specific context that reveals content, form, and technique in a new way. First Impressions includes recent additions to the Anderson Collection by Louise Nevelson and Christopher Wool and marks the debut of these prints at the de Young.

And there are firsts for the collector. An inaugural purchase within a previously unexplored area of art may send him or her off in new directions, as did Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson’s first encounter in 1968 with Richard Diebenkorn’s 41 Etchings Drypoints, itself the artist’s first publication with the then-fledgling Crown Point Press. The suite of prints—which Moo and her husband, “Hunk” (Harry, who died in February), count as their earliest acquisition within the realm of contemporary art—inspired in them a lifelong commitment to collecting contemporary American prints.

de Young Museum, San Francisco


Jeff Koons

SEA OF DESIRE (group show)
Fondation Carmignac, Porquerolles
2 June - 4 November 2018

The phrase SEA OF DESIRE, written in sprawling letters on a large-scale painting by Ed Ruscha, greets the visitors at the end of their journey through the Porquerolles forest. ‘Words have temperature’, states the artist, ‘When they reach a certain point and become burning words, then they appeal to me….’. The ’word temperature’ of SEA OF DESIRE is hot, boiling over with ambiguous meaning. On the one hand, this sentence expresses the Eros drive and our desire for beauty. On the other, it contains our irresistible attraction to drama and potentially, destruction.

These two contrary and inseparable predilections sit at the heart of a literary masterpiece, written not far from Porquerolles, at Sanary sur Mer, in 1931: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. This science-fiction novel anticipated profound social changes due to new technologies, propaganda and mind control. Thirty years later, Huxley revisited his novel and reassessed that the world was fulfilling his prophecy in high-speed: a seductive world entertaining for the masses, but rotten and manipulative under the surface.

Fifty years ago in France, in May 1968, there was an awakening. The outbursts meant protest, civil disobedience, as well as newfound freedoms and the upheaval of old rules and systems. The exhibition SEA OF DESIRE does not throw paving stones, as in the May 1968 movement, but it does confront the viewer with artworks that challenge their appetite for revolt, freedom and beauty.

SEA OF DESIRE is devised as a journey guided by the thread of desire, which visitors must follow in order to lose themselves, from the first staircase that leads them beneath the surface. Rebellious iconic artists are in dialogue with each other throughout the eight chapters that structure the exhibition, from ‘Pop Icons Reloaded’ to ‘Brave New World Revisited’, including Sandro Botticelli, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, and Jean-Michel Basquiat, along with younger artists whose artistic voices are no less loud and clear.

Fondation Carmignac, Porquerolles


Jeff Koons

De Calder à Koons, bijoux d’artistes. La collection idéale de Diane Venet (group show)
Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris
7 March - 9 September 2018

From Alexander Calder to Jeff Koons and ranging from Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso and Niki de Saint Phalle to César, Takis and Louise Bourgeois, a host of modern and contemporary artists have taken a close interest in jewellery. Diane Venet, who has collected artist’s jewellery for more than thirty years, is sharing her passion for these miniature artworks that often echo the artist’s formal language. Her collection of some 230 pieces, complemented by exceptional loans from galleries, collectors and the artists’ families, chronologically and thematically illustrates the work of 150 French and foreign artists. From March 7 to July 8, 2018, Diane Venet’s jewellery collection will be showcased in an exhibition designed by interior architect Antoine Plazanet and graphic designers ÉricandMarie.

Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris


Jeff Koons

The Sonnabend Collection. Part II (group show)
Museu Serralves, Porto
11 May - 23 September 2018

Jeff Koons, Hulk (Friends), 2004–12 © Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons, Hulk (Friends), 2004–12 © Jeff Koons

Following the presentation of The Sonnabend Collection. Half a Century of American and European Art. Part I in 2016, the Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art presents a major exhibition devoted to the Sonnabend Collection, The Sonnabend Collection. Part II.

Created by the influential art dealer Ileana Sonnabend, the Sonnabend Collection is considered one of the most important collections of American and European art of the second half of the twentieth century, representing some of the most influential western art movements of our time. While known for her support of the prime artistic protagonists of pop art, minimalism, arte povera, post-minimalism and conceptual art, Sonnabend’s engagement continued up to her death in 2007.

Part II will not be a chronological continuation of Part I, in 2016, but an exploration of two other themes present in the Sonnabend Collection:  the use of photography starting with conceptual art in the 1960s and coming up to the present; and the work of artists from the 1980s which relate to pop art, minimalism, and conceptual art. The exhibition will include works by Gilbert & George, Bernd and Hilla Becher, John Baldessari, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Candida Hofer, Haim Steinbach and Ashley Bickerton, among others. A presentation of sculptures by Jeff Koons, produced between 1985 and 2012, will constitute a small retrospective exhibition of works by this iconic American artist.

Museu Serralves, Porto


Jeff Koons

Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Visions (group show)
The Getty Villa, Los Angeles
18 April - 3 September 2018

Jeff Koons, Play-Doh, 1994–2014 © Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons, Play-Doh, 1994–2014 © Jeff Koons

Plato is one of the founding figures of Western civilization. His legacy encompasses ethics, politics, theology, and poetics. In this exhibition at the Getty Villa, a museum exploring classical art and culture, some of today's most celebrated artists consider Plato's impact on the contemporary world. In the form of sculptures, paintings, drawings, and large-scale installations, they respond to his contribution to philosophy—from defining the ideal to understanding the human condition—while fostering the ultimate Platonic experience: contemplation.

The Getty Villa, Los Angeles