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Rineke Dijkstra, Thomas Struth et al.

SNAP. Documentary and portrait photography from the collection (group show)
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo
17 February – 3 September 2017

Thomas Struth, Museo Del Prado 4, Madrid 2005, 2005 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Museo Del Prado 4, Madrid 2005, 2005 © Thomas Struth

Does documentary photography show a true picture of the world? Do portrait photographs capture a person’s identity? Today pictures are shared in vast numbers on social media. This exhibition explores how photography has pictured people from the 19th century to the present.

The exhibition sheds light on three key periods in the documentary genre: 1880s social documentary, 1960s street photography, and 1990s everyday documentary.

In the portrait genre, “Snap” shows contemporary photography from the 1990s through to 2016. The exhibition explores how identity and political standpoints are conveyed and how portrait and documentary photography interweave to create new narratives about the times in which we live.

“Snap” presents more than 100 photographs – both from the collection and loaned in for the occasion – by thirty acclaimed Norwegian and international photographers.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo


Additional:

Thomas Struth

Bernd, Hilla and the Others: Photography from Düsseldorf (group show)
Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography, Amsterdam
9 March - 3 June 2018

In the spring of 2018 Huis Marseille will be devoted to the so-called Düsseldorfer Photoschule, photographers who studied at the Dusseldorf Art Academy under Bernd and Hilla Becher or their successors Thomas Ruff and Andreas Gursky. The photographic vision of Bernd and Hilla Becher was so influential and successful that these photographers – also known as the Becher-Schüler – have left their stamp on contemporary photography from the mid-1970s onwards. Huis Marseille has a considerable collection of photographs from the Dusseldorf school. These will be presented in the exhibition alongside early, mostly unknown work by photographers such as Höfer, Ruff and Struth, as well as more recent work by young and upcoming photographers.

Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography, Amsterdam


Thomas Struth

Nature Unleashed: The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 (group show)
Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg
29 June - 14 October 2018

In a large-scale exhibition spanning several epochs, the Hamburger Kunsthalle traces based on important works how artists working in different media picture natural catastrophes while also shedding light on humanity’s failure to come to terms with nature due, among other things, of our faith in technology. Nature Unleashed: The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 features approximately 120 exhibits, including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, photographs, films and videos. As viewers make their way past blazing fires, earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions and sinking ships, they will take note of pictorial constants in the expression of such disasters but will also become aware of the differences in depiction from one era to the next. The show’s special appeal lies in the close juxtaposition of artworks created centuries apart. The trajectory of exhibited works spans an arc from the years around 1600 to the present day. Contemporary works serve to anchor the theme in the here and now and underline its topicality.

Catastrophes are omnipresent. The media constantly reports on natural disasters, acts of war, political upheavals and other crisis scenarios, characterising them all with the common term “catastrophe”. Catastrophes don’t just happen, they are made. It is only in our perception, in our active engagement with such drastic events that they take on distinctive contours and reveal their typical face. Every age makes its own catastrophes and redefines the criteria by which certain events are labelled as such. These fundamental observations form the basis for the exhibition project.

Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg


Rineke Dijkstra

Rineke Dijkstra (solo show)
De Pont Museum, Tilburg
10 March - 22 July 2018

Rineke Dijkstra, Vondelpark, Amsterdam, June 19, 2005, 2005 © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, Vondelpark, Amsterdam, June 19, 2005, 2005 © Rineke Dijkstra

Rineke Dijkstra (Sittart 1959) became internationally known with her "Beach Portraits" during the 1990s. With this moving series of photographs, she established her reputation as a maker of portraits that express the identity, vulnerability and dignity of the subjects. Last year she was granted the Hasselblad Award, a prestigious photography prize.

Dijkstra prefers to work in series, which allow the differences and similarities among the portrait subjects and their cultural backgrounds to emerge in a subtle manner. The time-consuming process of working with a technical camera determines her approach. She creates the conditions and plays with the light, which appears to be natural and yet has a slightly different appearance. She chooses her figures carefully, but chance plays a significant role as well. The sharply focused photographs give the viewer a sense of being face to face with the portrait subjects. At the same time, the serial character of the work also makes the subjects lose a certain degree of individuality. As a viewer, one mainly identifies with the universal human feelings (e.g. shyness, a lack of ease) displayed by them.
The theme of transformation keeps on surfacing in various series, such as the one in which a friendly-looking French boy evolves, in just a few years, into a stalwart soldier. But is this real, or is he playing a role?

Such questions interest Dijkstra. Despite the faithfully rendered appearance of the photograph, the portrait subject ultimately remains unfathomable and elusive. Who is hiding behind a mask, and who is showing his or her true face? This dilemma is subtly conveyed in the video of Marianna, a ten-year-old Russian ballerina who practices her dance steps in a pink studio. The cloyingly sweet surroundings and the spirited music stand in stark contrast to the stern voice of a teacher who is giving instructions off screen. With each new attempt to execute the steps perfectly, Marianna smiles as she has been conditioned to do, but gradually a certain fatigue and defiance nonetheless begin to emerge.

De Pont Museum, Tilburg


Rineke Dijkstra

"I am a native foreigner" (group show)
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
22 September 2017 - 2 June 2018

The Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is mounting a series of exhibitions in 2017 and 2018 that explore different aspects of the theme migration. “I Am a Native Foreigner” examines migration by focusing on the museum’s collection: what are artists' views on migration, and how do they visualise it in their work? This collection presentation considers the effects of migration on artists both past and present, and reveals how they dealt with, and depicted, the impact of displacement. The title “I Am a Native Foreigner” is taken from a statement made by the Mexican artist Ulises Carrión (1941-1989), who settled in Amsterdam in the 1970s.

The work in “I Am a Native Foreigner” ranges from photographs of Dutch immigrants disembarking at New York’s Ellis Island around 1900, and Surinamese-born Dutch who made their home in the Bijlmer in Amsterdam southeast in the late ‘70s, to more recent images of refugees off the coast of southern Spain.

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam


Thomas Struth

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture (group show)
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill
18 March - 17 June 2018

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture is a comprehensive survey that explores the dynamic relationship between architecture, photography, and the viewer. Seen through the lens of historical and architectural photographers from the 1930s to the present, Image Building offers a nuanced perspective on how photographs affect our understanding of the built environment and our social and personal identities. The exhibition features 57 images that explore the social, psychological, and conceptual implications of architecture through the subjective interpretation of those who captured it.

Organized by guest curator Therese Lichtenstein, Ph. D, Image Building brings together works by 19 renowned, under-recognized, and emerging artists ranging from early modern to contemporary architectural photographers. In addition to photographs, Image Building includes ephemera such as magazines and books that illustrate how the meaning of photography shifts when presented in the context of high art or mass culture. 

Organized thematically into Cityscapes, Domestic Spaces, and Public Places, the exhibition examines the relationship between contemporary and historical approaches to photographing buildings in urban, suburban, and rural environments, looking at influences, similarities and differences. By juxtaposing these photographs, Image Building creates a dialogue between the past and present, revealing the ways photography shapes and frames the perception of architecture, and how that perception is transformed over time.

Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill


Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth (solo show)
Aspen Art Museum, Aspen
19 January – 10 June 2018

Thomas Struth, Front Yard, Tel Aviv 2014, 2014 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Front Yard, Tel Aviv 2014, 2014 © Thomas Struth

Acclaimed German artist Thomas Struth’s pivotal series on the Middle East is on view in Gallery 1 in its entirety for the first time. The series of eighteen monumental photographs of Israel and Palestine taken between 2009 and 2014 depicts places and people throughout the region, encompassing street views, sites of technological research, and family portraits. Photographing within the political climates of East Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, the Golan Heights, Ramallah, Al-Khalil/Hebron, Nazareth, and Negev, Struth conveys vivid and emotional narratives of place.

Aspen Art Museum, Aspen


Rineke Dijkstra

Collection Centre Pompidou (group show)
Centre Pompidou, Malaga, from 28 March 2015 - ongoing

Rineke Dijkstra, I See a Woman Crying ( Weeping Woman ), 2009
Rineke Dijkstra, I See a Woman Crying ( Weeping Woman ), 2009

The world famous gallery Centre Pompidou is coming to Malaga. Without doubt the Pompidou art center in Paris is one of the greatest homes of twentieth century art. In line with the arresting appearance of the Pompidou in Paris the Malaga collection will be housed in the large glass cube, built with a cultural purpose in mind and which is situated at the corner which joins Muelle Uno and Muelle Dos of Malaga’s newly renovated port. The new Malaga Pop-Up museum will house a fine selection of its French mother. The museum that is at time of writing under full construction is expected to open on March 28th, just before the touristic season takes off.


Centre Pompidou, Malaga