clear

Thomas Struth

This Place (group show)
The Picker Art Gallery at Colgate University, Hamilton
1 February - 20 May 2018

This Place comprises the work of twelve photographers who, between 2009 and 2012, spent extended periods of time in Israel and the West Bank. Frédéric Brenner, Wendy Ewald, Martin Kollar, Josef Koudelka, Jungjin Lee, Gilles Peress, Fazal Sheikh, Stephen Shore, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, and Nick Waplington each brought their own expertise and perspective to bear in developing their individual projects. Brought together in This Place, their photographs reveal a portrait of a land and its peoples that is complex, fragmented, and paradoxical.

The Picker Art Gallery will present works by four of the twelve photographers: Josef Koudelka, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, and Nick Waplington. The exhibition is part of a collaborative project with the Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, the University Art Museum at SUNY Albany, and the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College. Each museum is exhibiting their portion of This Place concurrently. This experimental presentation underlines the intention of the organizers and institutions to offer the exhibition as a space of experimentation, questioning, and dialogue.

The Picker Art Gallery at Colgate University, Hamilton


Additional:

Thomas Struth

Ways of Seeing (group show)
NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, Abu Dhabi
3 September - 17 November 2018

Ways of Seeing brings together 26 internationally-acclaimed artists and art collectives from the region and the world, working in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, photography, sound, film, and installation. This exhibition is curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, founders of the multi-disciplinary curatorial platform Art Reoriented, and co-chairmen of the Montblanc Cultural Foundation.

The exhibition is based on John Berger’s seminal 1972 text on visual culture, Ways of Seeing, in which he shifted the emphasis of art criticism away from the professional art-expert and relocated it within the grasp of the layperson. In taking its cue from Berger’s groundbreaking argument, this exhibition invites the viewer to actively engage with the artwork, and to explore the ways by which artists assign forms and concepts that seem familiar with renewed appearances and meanings.

NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, Abu Dhabi


Thomas Struth

Nature Unleashed: The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 (group show)
Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg
29 June - 14 October 2018

Thomas Struth, Louvre 4, Paris 1989, 1989 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Louvre 4, Paris 1989, 1989 © Thomas Struth

In a large-scale exhibition spanning several epochs, the Hamburger Kunsthalle traces based on important works how artists working in different media picture natural catastrophes while also shedding light on humanity’s failure to come to terms with nature due, among other things, of our faith in technology. Nature Unleashed: The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 features approximately 120 exhibits, including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, photographs, films and videos. As viewers make their way past blazing fires, earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions and sinking ships, they will take note of pictorial constants in the expression of such disasters but will also become aware of the differences in depiction from one era to the next. The show’s special appeal lies in the close juxtaposition of artworks created centuries apart. The trajectory of exhibited works spans an arc from the years around 1600 to the present day. Contemporary works serve to anchor the theme in the here and now and underline its topicality.

Catastrophes are omnipresent. The media constantly reports on natural disasters, acts of war, political upheavals and other crisis scenarios, characterising them all with the common term “catastrophe”. Catastrophes don’t just happen, they are made. It is only in our perception, in our active engagement with such drastic events that they take on distinctive contours and reveal their typical face. Every age makes its own catastrophes and redefines the criteria by which certain events are labelled as such. These fundamental observations form the basis for the exhibition project.

Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg


Thomas Struth

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture (group show)
Frist Art Museum, Nashville
20 July - 28 October 2018

Thomas Struth, Pergamon Museum I, Berlin, 2001 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Pergamon Museum I, Berlin, 2001 © Thomas Struth

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture explores the changing relationship between viewer, photographer, and architect, from the 1930s to the present. Demonstrating how photographers connect a building’s identity with the people who reside in, work in, visit, or simply look at it, the exhibition also reveals how this understanding may be layered, reinforced, or in some instances radically reinterpreted.

Buildings and the way they are photographed are visible symbols of a society’s desires and the social, economic, and aesthetic concerns of an era. Photographers choose between black-and-white and color, sharp contrast and soft focus, and straightforward and dramatic framing to record their subjects. Contemporary photographers add the use of new digital technologies, allowing for an even greater manipulation of an image. Whatever the medium, the intent is to involve the viewer in understanding the symbolism of architecture and public spaces. By combining different contexts and frames of meaning, Image Building invites viewers to actively experience structures and spaces in novel and expanded ways.

Many architects hope that their conceptual intentions will last as long as the actual structures. Creating a perception—a mental or actual image of a structure—has become a vital element to architectural practice, shaping architects’ ideas about how buildings will look in addition to how they are experienced. But the messages contained in architecture are filtered and even altered by the lenses of a changing society. This exhibition presents fascinating photographic conversations between architect and artist, past and present, and facts, dreams, and illusions.

Frist Art Museum, Nashville


Günther Förg, Thomas Struth et al.

Light Sensitive 2: Photography from the Schaufler Collection (group show)
SCHAUWERK, Sindelfingen
15 April 2018 - 6 January 2020

Thomas Struth, Grosse Tannen Am Eschberg - N°13, Winterthur 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Grosse Tannen Am Eschberg - N°13, Winterthur 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth

Contemporary photography from the Schaufler Collection will be on display from September 2017 at the SCHAUWERK Sindelfingen. The museum will link this show to the LICHTEMPFINDLICH exhibition of 2011, which had presented the large collection of this medium to the public for the first time in the impressive space of the former high rack warehouse in the SCHAUWERK. This lofty storage space inspires with its revolving ramp, which extends over 15 metres upward: an exhibition place par excellence for photography, with spectacular visual axes for viewing from near and afar.

Along with major works from the first exhibition, LICHTEMPFINDLICH 2 will also display photographs that previously haven’t been shown, so that a more comprehensive representation of the contemporary photography collection can occur. The main interest of the collectors Peter Schaufler and Christiane Schaufler-Münch is not directed toward the medium and its history per se, but leans more toward the fascination that arises from certain motifs, pictorial inventions, and their formal transformations.

The classic genres of photography—nude, portrait, landscape, architecture, or industry—are mirrored in the works, but are often citations or stages of conceptual processes. Most of the protagonists within the context of this collection have left behind the conventional framework of photography.

SCHAUWERK, Sindelfingen