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Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel: Symbols of Actual Life (solo show)
Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco
19 April - 5 August 2018

Julian Schnabel, installation view, Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, 2018 Photo: Jeffrey Moanalani. Courtesy of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Julian Schnabel, installation view, Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, 2018 Photo: Jeffrey Moanalani. Courtesy of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Since 1977, Julian Schnabel (b. 1951) has captured people’s imagination with paintings that speak to his incessant appetite for sculptural physicality, material diversity, and pictorial symbolism that have resulted in ever more audaciously scaled paintings that oscillate between abstraction and figuration. The exhibition Julian Schnabel: Symbols of Actual Life will feature a new body of work created for the Legion’s Court of Honor. At twenty-four by twenty-four feet, the paintings are both monumental in scale and ephemeral in nature. Exposed to the elements over the four-month run of the exhibition, they aren’t meant to last and as such, in the artist’s words, "epitomize much of what are the essential characteristics of the smallest and most nascent proposals of how imagery drawing and material could be called a painting." In addition, Schnabel will show eight paintings from three distinct bodies of work including a new series of abstractions on Mexican sack linen, as well as examples from the Goat Paintings (begun in 2012) and the Jane Birkin series (1990).

Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco


Additional:

Julian Schnabel

Aktion Paintings 1985-2017 (solo show)
ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus
12 October 2018 - 3 March 2019

Julian Schnabel, Big Girl Painting, 2013. Courtesy of the artist and private collection. Photo Tom Powel Imaging
Julian Schnabel, Big Girl Painting, 2013. Courtesy of the artist and private collection. Photo Tom Powel Imaging

ARoS Aarhus Art Museum’s major special exhibition for Autumn 2018 offers a retrospective on one of American art’s great heavyweights — the American painter and film director Julian Schnabel (b. 1951).

The exhibition will be the largest presentation ever of this artist in the Nordic region and will be a sweeping tour de force of the artist’s work over several decades. The exhibition has been arranged in close collaboration with the artist himself and will show over 40 large scale works from a career spanning more than 30 years.

Julian Schnabel stands out as the most noteworthy figure in the revival of figurative and narrative painting at the start of the 1980s. A blustering neo-expressionism that emerged after painting had been disavowed for several years in favour of the 1970s more conceptual and, not least, inward-looking art forms.

Julian Schnabel began his artistic career in the US where he, together with a distinguished group of artists that included Jean-Michel Basquiat, strove to return narrative painting and the subjective to art. This had been abandoned for a long period in favour of a decidedly minimalistic and conceptual style. Known in his younger years as New York’s enfant terrible, Julian Schnabel was friends with Andy Warhol and Basquiat and their circle.

Schnabel became world renowned in the early 1980s for his enormous plate paintings that were painted on large shards of broken porcelain. Schnabel had been inspired to create these after visiting Gaudi’s Parc Güell in Barcelona, famed for its mosaic benches. Schnabel won acclaim and success for his use of unconventional and discordant materials such as smashed plates and visitors to the exhibition will encounter a wealth of varying types of painting, encompassing painted plates and old, distressed tarpaulins, canvas and photographic prints.

The exhibition has come about in close collaboration with Julian Schnabel himself and ARoS and the artist have envisaged an innovative architecture that will lead visitors on a journey around Julian Schnabel’s artistic universe.

In a Danish context, the Danish counterparts to Schnabel, De Unge Vilde, have had a substantial impact on shaping Danish art from the 1980s up to today. Danish artists of the 1980s are among the most celebrated Danish artists and their reintroduction of narrative as foundational for the painting has echoes in Danish art even today. Similarly, ARoS has for many years evinced a particular interest in the wild paintings of the 80s that comprise a large part of the museum’s permanent collection.

The neo-expressionism that Schnabel is an exponent of has founded schools of artists ever since and one can see the legacy of Julian Schnabel among young contemporary artists, both Danish and international, making Julian Schnabel more relevant than ever before.

ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus



Julian Schnabel

Orsay seen by Julian Schnabel (solo and curated show)
Musée d'Orsay, Paris
10 October 2018 - 13 January 2019

Julian Schnabel, Peinture de rose (Près de la tombe de Van Gogh) XVII, 2017 © Julian Schnabel Studio /Tom Powel Imaging © Adagp, Paris 2018
Julian Schnabel, Peinture de rose (Près de la tombe de Van Gogh) XVII, 2017 © Julian Schnabel Studio /Tom Powel Imaging © Adagp, Paris 2018

For their first invitation of a figure of contemporary creation, the Musée d'Orsay invited painter and film-director Julian Schnabel to offer a reading of the collection, proposing a new scenography and a selection of works never simultaneously presented, in two historical rooms of the museum.

Julian Schnabel is one of the most important painters alive. Celebrated from the beginning of his carrier in the 1980s, his works are to be found in the most famous museums in the world, such as the MoMA in New York, Tate in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, which organized a solo exhibition of his works for the first time in 1987. He is also a major film-director, having directed movies such as Basquiat (1996), Before Night Falls (2000, Grand Prix of the Jury at the Venice Mostra), The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007, Golden Globe of the best international film, Golden Globe of the best director and best director award from the Cannes Festival).

For this exhibition, his first one in a major French institution since the Centre Pompidou, at the very time of the release of his movie dedicated to Van Gogh, At Eternity's Gate, the artist chose works from the collection of the museum, which enter in a conversation with each other: Van Gogh, Gauguin, presented in his movie, but also Cézanne, Manet, Courbet and less known but very influent artists such as Carolus-Duran and Théodule Ribot, in order to let the visitors look at these known works from a new perspective - that of Julian Schnabel.

In contrast to these works, the artist will present a selection of his own paintings from 1980 to 2017, bringing out the ever-existing qualities of the medium. Having been painted in dialogue with Manet or Van Gogh, his paintings offer a new, synthetic glance on the work of a major contemporary painter.

Musée d'Orsay, Paris


Günther Förg, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel et al.

Paintings from the 1980s and 1990s. MUDAM Collection (group show)
MUDAM, Luxembourg
29 September 2018 - 7 April 2019

Albert Oehlen, Bobo Alegre, 1996 © Photo: Rémi Villaggi. Courtesy of the artist and MUDAM, Luxembourg
Albert Oehlen, Bobo Alegre, 1996 © Photo: Rémi Villaggi. Courtesy of the artist and MUDAM, Luxembourg

The Mudam Collection is the most important collection of contemporary art in Luxembourg. Resolutely international in its scope and ambition, the collection's holdings consist of close to 700 works of art in all media by artists from Luxembourg and around the world. The constitution of the collection traces back to the first acquisitions for the museum in the 1990s, the creation of the Museum of Modern Art Grand-Duc Jean Foundation in 1998, and the opening of the Museum in 2006. The majority of works in the collection date from 1989 to the present.

Starting in the autumn of 2018, Mudam launches a new cycle unveiling the museum’s collection and its history. This first chapter features a rich selection of paintings from the 1980s and 1990s. It presents the diversity of possibilities offered by the medium in terms of a history of painting.

MUDAM, Luxembourg


Julian Schnabel

At Eternity's Gate (film premiere)
75th Venice International Film Festival, Venice
From 3 September 2018

Willem Dafoe as Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s new film At Eternity’s Gate. Courtesy of the artist and the 75th Venice International Film Festival
Willem Dafoe as Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s new film At Eternity’s Gate. Courtesy of the artist and the 75th Venice International Film Festival

This movie is an accumulation of scenes based on Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings, common agreement about events in his life that parade as facts, hearsay, and scenes that are just plain invented. The making of art gives an opportunity to make a palpable body that expresses a reason to live, if such a thing exists. Even with all the violence and tragedy that has been associated with Van Gogh’s life, there is no doubt, his was a life lived rich with magic, profound communication with nature and the wonder of being. Van Gogh’s work is ultimately optimistic. His unique perspective is one whose belief and vision make visible and physical the inexpressible. He seems to have transgressed death and encouraged others to do the same.

75th Venice International Film Festival, Venice