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Bridget Riley

Op Art in Focus (group show)
Tate Liverpool, Liverpool
21 July 2018 - 2 June 2019

A dazzling display from pioneering artists of the 1960s to today

Op art – short for optical art – emerged in the 1960s. Its leading figures included Bridget Riley, Jesus Rafael Soto and Victor Vasarely. They combined lines, geometric shapes and eye popping colour to create artworks that fool the eye. Images could be subtle or disorientating, giving the illusion of movement. The display moves beyond the typical period of op art and includes works by more contemporary artists such as Angela Bulloch. Included is a rare installation of Jim Lambie’s Zobop which floods the entire gallery floor with psychedelic patterning.

Op art in Focus is a part of Tate Liverpool’s in Focus series – displays of the Tate collection dedicated to significant modern and contemporary artists or movements.

Tate


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Bridget Riley

Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520–1970 (group show)
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart
23 November 2019 – 19 April 2020

Bridget Riley, Hesitate, 1964 © Tate, London/Bildrecht Wien/ Bridget Riley, 2019
Bridget Riley, Hesitate, 1964 © Tate, London/Bildrecht Wien/ Bridget Riley, 2019

Of all the art movements of the 1950s and 1960s, op art has hitherto received the least attention. Often it is denigrated as being too spectacular and superficial. This is a misconception—this art sharpens our awareness of the ambiguity of appearances and illustrates the impossibility of grasping “reality.” Under the title Vertigo, mumok presents a deceptive game of the senses, presenting a wide spectrum ranging from panel paintings, reliefs, and objects to installations and experiential spaces, to film and computer-generated art.
Op art works are by no means only directed at our sense of sight. With their powerful effects and optical illusions they lead to experiences of sensory overkill, which can then affect the whole body. In all of this, op art remains indebted to the anti-classical. In this sense, the exhibition also includes references to anti-classical art from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries and to precursors from the first half of the twentieth century, works that also use pulsating patterns, beating and ephemeral after-images, paradoxical illusions of space, and other methods of optical illusions

This exhibition was initiated by mumok, where it is on show until 26 October 2019, and is implemented in cooperation with Kunstmuseum Stuttgart. Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520–1970 is generously supported by the Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne.

Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Markus Wörgötter.

Kunstmuseum Stuttgart


Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley (solo show)
The Hayward Gallery, London
23 October 2019 - 26 January 2020

Bridget Riley, Movement in Squares, 1961. Collection: Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London. Courtesy of the Bridget Riley Archive. © Bridget Riley 2019. All rights reserved.
Bridget Riley, Movement in Squares, 1961. Collection: Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London. Courtesy of the Bridget Riley Archive. © Bridget Riley 2019. All rights reserved.

In October 2019, Hayward Gallery will host a major retrospective exhibition devoted to the work of celebrated British artist Bridget Riley.

Organised by the National Galleries of Scotland in partnership with Hayward Gallery and in close collaboration with the artist, this comprehensive exhibition will be the first large-scale survey of Riley’s work to be held in the UK for 16 years.

The exhibition will look closely at the origins of Riley’s perceptual paintings and will trace pivotal, decisive moments in her acclaimed career.

It will feature the artist’s iconic black-and-white paintings of the 1960s, early representational paintings, expansive canvases in colour and recent wall paintings, as well as studies and preparatory material.

Alongside her best known canvases, the exhibition will also include the only three-dimensional work that the artist ever realised, Continuum (1963), as well as new wall paintings made specially for Hayward Gallery.

Spanning 70 years of Riley’s work, the exhibition will offer visitors an unparalleled opportunity to experience powerful and engaging works by one of the most important artists of our time. 

The Hayward Gallery, London


Bridget Riley

Prints 1962 - 2019 (solo show)
Museum im Kulturspeicher, Würzburg
17 August - 13 October 2019

Bridget Riley, After Rajasthan, Final Cartoon, 2012. Photo: Courtesy Bridget Riley Archives © Bridget Riley 2019. All Rights Reserved.
Bridget Riley, After Rajasthan, Final Cartoon, 2012. Photo: Courtesy Bridget Riley Archives © Bridget Riley 2019. All Rights Reserved.

The subjects and content of the temporary exhibitions of the museum in the Kulturspeicher often refer to the two collections of the museum. The "Bridget Riley" project is linked to the "Sammlung Peter C. Ruppert. Konkrete Kunst in Europa nach 1945", in which two paintings by the fascinating British artist are presented. Bridget Riley, born in London in 1931, spent part of her childhood in Cornwall. This laid the foundation for her close connection to nature, although her art does not depict anything. Observations of natural phenomena continue to inspire her today in a free sense. Trained in the impressionist painting of Georges Seurat, she soon concentrated on color in the picture without assigning it a descriptive function. Rather, she still uses it today as a structure that creates oscillation and vibration effects on the surface.

The exhibition gathers screen prints from the early years from 1962 onwards in black and white, the greatest possible contrast as a "surrogate for color" (Bridget Riley), as well as above all numerous brilliant color prints from the 1970s to the present day and thus encompasses works from more than half a century. In picture series and individual sheets, the prints show what makes Bridget Riley's art so special: to present color and light while teaching the viewer the pleasure of seeing.

A total of 80 screen prints from the artist's London studio can be seen. The two paintings from the Ruppert Collection, which is housed in the museum's Kulturspeicher, are also integrated into the exhibition. It was curated by art historian Susanne A. Kudielka, who, like her brother Robert Kudielka, has accompanied Bridget Riley's work for many years.

Museum im Kulturspeicher, Würzburg


Bridget Riley

Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520 - 1970 (group show)
mumok, Vienna
25 May - 20 October 2019

Bridget Riley, Hesitate, 1964 © Tate, London/Bildrecht Wien/ Bridget Riley, 2019
Bridget Riley, Hesitate, 1964 © Tate, London/Bildrecht Wien/ Bridget Riley, 2019

Of all the pioneering art movements of the 1960s, Op art and kinetic art seem to have been accorded the least recognition. Often they were depreciatingly seen as too spectacular and thus superficial. Wrongly so, since Op art and kinetic art sharpen our awareness of the ambiguous nature of reality. They quite literally show us that perception is not objective but dependent on volatile parameters relating to context and to the beholder, with all the epistemological consequences that this has.

The exhibition Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520 - 1970 presents a puzzling world of sensory illusion, comprising a broad spectrum of works including paintings, reliefs, and objects, installations and experiential spaces, and film and computer generated art.

mumok, Vienna


Bridget Riley

Messengers (wall painting)
The National Gallery, London
From 17 January 2019

Bridget Riley with Messengers by Bridget Riley, Annenberg Court, The National Gallery © 2019 Bridget Riley. All rights reserved / Photo: The National Gallery, London
Bridget Riley with Messengers by Bridget Riley, Annenberg Court, The National Gallery © 2019 Bridget Riley. All rights reserved / Photo: The National Gallery, London

See Messengers, a new large-scale wall painting by Bridget Riley: one of the most important artists of her generation.

The title, Messengers, is inspired by a phrase Constable used when referring to clouds, and might also be an allusion to the numerous angels, bearers of news, that we see in the skies of so many National Gallery pictures.

Painted directly onto the wall of the Annenberg Court and spanning a vast 10 x 20 metres, the abstract work, comprised of coloured discs, carries influences from our historic collection over into the 21st century. Throughout art history, harmonies of colour have played a large part in pictorial composition.Taking as a point of departure the paintings of George Seurat, in particular Bathers at Asnières, Bridget Riley’s 'Messengers' transforms the Annenberg Court into a great white space in which coloured discs float as clouds drift in the lanes of the sky. By leaving after-images on the viewer's retina that suggest volume and movement the longer it is perceived, the work becomes a tribute to its artistic predecessors and to the process of looking at art itself.

Bridget Riley (born 1931) has a long-standing relationship with the Gallery; she made copies of paintings in the collection including Jan van Eyck’s Portrait of a Man (Self Portrait?), 1433, as a teenager as part of her portfolio when applying to Goldsmiths College, London, just after the end of the Second World War, and Georges Seurat's Bathers at Asnières while training as an artist.

In 1989 Riley was invited to select that year’s Artist’s Eye exhibition and between 2010 and 2011 the Gallery held her acclaimed exhibition Bridget Riley: Paintings and Related Work.

The National Gallery, London