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Darren Almond

THE MOON. From Inner Worlds to Outer Space (group show)
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek
13 September 2018 - 20 January 2019

Darren Almond. Fullmoon @Yesnaby, 2007 © Darren Almond. Courtesy White Cube
Darren Almond. Fullmoon @Yesnaby, 2007 © Darren Almond. Courtesy White Cube

From painting to virtual reality, superstition to science, myths to missions, fantasies to space colonies, join Louisiana on a trip to the Moon—into space and into ourselves.

This large-scale exhibition at Louisiana highlights the role, the importance and the fascinating power of the Moon. The exhibition presents more than 200 works and objects—and show how the round white disc is reflected in our art and cultural history. From Galileo's moon map to Norman Foster's plans for 3D-printed moon bases.

The exhibition mixes art, film, music, literature, architecture, cultural history, design and natural science into a vibrant and diverse portrait of our closest neighbor in the sky. We encounter the Moon as a fundamental symbol and as a goal of romantic and artistic longings, scientific inquiry, existential issues—and the urge for political expansion.

With this exhibition, Louisiana commemorates the imminent 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon and also calls attention to a strong and renewed interest in the Moon both in art and as a springboard for a new Space Race with all its strategic and economic implications.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek


Additional:

Darren Almond, Thomas Struth et al.

Wilderness (group show)
Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt
1 November 2018 - 3 February 2019

Darren Almond, Fullmoon@Cerro Chaltén, 2013 © Darren Almond
Darren Almond, Fullmoon@Cerro Chaltén, 2013 © Darren Almond

The wilderness returns to art! And it does so at a time when the blank spaces on the world map have largely disappeared and an “untouched natural state” virtually only exists in the form of areas designated as nature reserves. The search for the last open spaces, the expedition as an artistic medium, and post-human visions of a world devoid of people characterize the works of many contemporary artists alongside the renegotiation of the relationship between individual and beast. The SCHIRN is dedicating an extensive thematic exhibition to this recurring fascination and presents works of art from 1900 to the present. With important pieces by some 30 artists – inlcuding Tacita Dean, Mark Dion, Jean Dubuf­fet, Max Ernst, Asger Jorn, Geor­gia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, Frank Stella, Thomas Struth, Henri Rous­seau und Carle­ton E. Watkins – it not only sheds light on the phenomenon of the wilderness in terms of iconography, but also shows it as a principle and motor of artistic creative work. Artists have repeatedly been drawn to that which is wild, untamed, uncultivated since the beginning of the aesthetic modern age. The “wilderness” has always also served as a projection surface for anything that was different and foreign, for the longing for a primordial life beyond the boundaries of civilization. In today’s “Anthropocene,” the utopia of a natural state remote from culture and human influence seems anachronistic. And yet the examination of traditional images and fictions of wilderness seems more alive than ever before.

Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt


Darren Almond, Raymond Hains, Joan Mitchell, Navid Nuur, Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille et al.

Painting the Night (group show)
Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz
13 October 2018 - 15 April 2019

Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille, Landscape with Earth and Moon, 2013. Courtesy of the artists and Almine Rech Gallery
Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille, Landscape with Earth and Moon, 2013. Courtesy of the artists and Almine Rech Gallery

The topic of night has infiltrated current debates concerning society (should we open shops at night or preserve that time for sleep?), the environment (how can we limit night light pollution which prevents us from seeing the stars and impacts natural life?), politics (the French “Nuit Debout” movement, clandestine nightly border crossings), science (we are constantly furthering our knowledge of the phenomenon).

Night-time, and the many questions it prompts, has haunted artists particularly since the late 19th century. Thanks to such ground-breaking discoveries as electrification and lighting, psychoanalysis and the advent of the space age the night has evolved, transforming us in turn: theories have consequently been completely reviewed changing our relationship to the night-tide.

From 13 October 2018 to 15 April 2019, Centre Pompidou-Metz is hosting an important exhibition featuring the night in modern and contemporary painting along with a catalogue and a wealth of associated events.

A prominent source of inspiration in the history of art, the night continues to offer a rich field of investigation. Revisiting such a vast topic spawns numerous profound interrogations on our condition and our place in the Universe and the role Art could play.

Though at first the idea might seem paradoxical, Painting the Night (Peindre la nuit in french) is in fact heavy with meaning. The title is voluntarily ambiguous for night painting could either mean representing the night or painting at night. Painting the dark or in the dark, a choice has to be made either to improve one’s night vision or on the contrary to abandon seeing altogether. Indeed it is at night that we can, both physically and symbolically, at last “disconnect from the world”— a typically modern aspiration. Actually, twilight would be a perfect metaphor for the elusive boundary between figuration and abstraction.

With a focus on the perception of night rather than its iconography, the exhibition intends to be, in fact, a nocturnal experience: as visitors weave their way in they become night-owls, the heady atmosphere of nightlife takes its hold teasing the senses, stirring the inner self inducing cosmic vertigo. One steps into the exhibition as one would step out into the night.

In keeping with the spirit of Centre Pompidou-Metz exhibitions, this show is not limited exclusively to paintings, though these are central, for parallels and resonances are established with, for instance, music and literature, as well as video and photography. The event groups about a hundred artists and historical figures (Winslow Homer, Francis Bacon, Anna-Eva Bergman, Louise Bourgeois, Brassaï, Helen Frankenthaler, Paul Klee, Lee Krasner, Henri Michaux, Joan Mitchell, Amédée Ozenfant, etc.) and contemporary artists (Etel Adnan, Charbel-joseph H. Boutros, Ann Craven, Peter Doig, Jennifer Douzenel, Rodney Graham, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Kneale, Olaf Nicolai, Gerhard Richter, etc.) as well as a number of spectacular installations, some of which were created especially for the project (Harold Ancart, Raphaël Dallaporta, Spencer Finch, Daisuke Yokota, Navid Nuur, etc.).

Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz