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Günther Förg, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel et al.

Paintings from the 1980s and 1990s. MUDAM Collection (group show)
MUDAM, Luxembourg
29 September 2018 - 7 April 2019

Albert Oehlen, Bobo Alegre, 1996 © Photo: Rémi Villaggi. Courtesy of the artist and MUDAM, Luxembourg
Albert Oehlen, Bobo Alegre, 1996 © Photo: Rémi Villaggi. Courtesy of the artist and MUDAM, Luxembourg

The Mudam Collection is the most important collection of contemporary art in Luxembourg. Resolutely international in its scope and ambition, the collection's holdings consist of close to 700 works of art in all media by artists from Luxembourg and around the world. The constitution of the collection traces back to the first acquisitions for the museum in the 1990s, the creation of the Museum of Modern Art Grand-Duc Jean Foundation in 1998, and the opening of the Museum in 2006. The majority of works in the collection date from 1989 to the present.

Starting in the autumn of 2018, Mudam launches a new cycle unveiling the museum’s collection and its history. This first chapter features a rich selection of paintings from the 1980s and 1990s. It presents the diversity of possibilities offered by the medium in terms of a history of painting.

MUDAM, Luxembourg


Additional:

Albert Oehlen

Hyper! A Journey into Art and Music (group show)
Halle für Aktuelle Kunst, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg
1 March – 11 August 2019

Sound, vision, film, a destroyed piano: What happens when musicians make use of ideas and strategies from the art world? And what kind of pictures result when painters are influenced by music? To be interested in other people’s lives, to follow the unknown, to copy it, to use it in one’s own work – in short, to cross-map between the worlds of music and the visual arts: this is the subject of the exhibition HYPER! A JOURNEY INTO ART AND MUSIC curated by Max Dax, the former editor-in-chief of Spex and Electronic Beats.

The exhibition at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg and the accompanying program of musical events at the Elbphilharmonie includes more than 40 international artists and musicians who explicitly work between ​​the disciplines of art and music and – often unnoticed by their audiences – decisively integrate references from both these areas into their art.

The multimedia exhibition will include classic works such as Peter Saville’s groundbreaking album cover for New Order’s 1983 masterpiece Power, Corruption and Lies as a mural, highlight the importance of Emil Schult’s narrative, minimalist imagery, on which the cover of Kraftwerk’s 1974 album Autobahn was based, and feature Cyprien Gaillard’s acclaimed 3D installation Night Life from 2015. The influence of Richard Wagner on the work of the performance artist Christoph Schlingensief, who died in 2010, will be shown, as well as a related video installation by Alexander Kluge. The mutual influences between music and art will be illustrated with examples by Albert Oehlen and Scooter, Thomas Scheibitz and Melvins, as well as Daniel Blumberg. Photographs and video works by Andrea Stappert, Sven Marquardt, Andreas Gursky, The KLF, Mark Leckey, and Bettina Pousttchi will lend the exhibition a documentary dimension. Significant collaborations between Tabea Blumenschein and Wolfgang Müller, Katharina Grosse and Stefan Schneider, as well as works by Rosemarie Trockel and Thea Djordjadze, Radenko Milak, and Bettina Scholz created specifically for Hyper! will make the exhibition a unique survey of the overlapping fields of music and art.

Deichtorhallen, Hamburg


Julian Schnabel

At Eternity's Gate (screening followed by a discussion with director Julian Schnabel)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
15 December, 7pm

Willem Dafoe as Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s new film At Eternity’s Gate. Courtesy of CBS Films
Willem Dafoe as Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s new film At Eternity’s Gate. Courtesy of CBS Films

Günther Förg

Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty (solo show)
Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas
21 October 2018 - 27 January 2019

Günther Förg, installation view, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, 2018. Photo: Chad Redmon. Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art
Günther Förg, installation view, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, 2018. Photo: Chad Redmon. Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty will survey the prolific and provocative career of the late artist Günther Förg (1952-2013). Förg was closely associated with the Cologne scene of the 1980s, a group of irreverent artists who challenged the traditions of painting. This exhibition—the first major museum presentation of his work in the United States since 1989—will bring renewed attention to Förg’s work by examining his legacy in relation to key issues of the 20th century, including postwar nostalgia and loss and the utopianism of high modernism. Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty is co-organized with the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and will be on view exclusively in the US at the DMA.

Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas


Albert Oehlen

TRANCE (solo show)
Aïshti Foundation, Beirut
22 October 2018 - End of September 2019

Albert Oehlen, installation view, Aïshti Foundation, Beirut, 2018. Photo: def image. Courtesy of the artist and Aïshti Foundation, Beirut
Albert Oehlen, installation view, Aïshti Foundation, Beirut, 2018. Photo: def image. Courtesy of the artist and Aïshti Foundation, Beirut

Aïshti Foundation is delighted to present Trance, an exhibition in three parts where Albert Oehlen plays simultaneously the role of the artist, the curator and the collector.

One of the most respected painters today, Albert Oehlen has explored the possibilities of painting since the 1980's, constantly questioning its methods and means through an ever-evolving style and technique. At the core of his practice are the limitations he imposes on himself as a point of departure, in order to have 'something to push against' and thereby expand and redefine our understanding of painting.

Oehlen's practice began with figurative paintings, which were defying the context of the 1980's were minimal and conceptual art prevailed. His provocative position, subjects and manner have been linked to the notion of Bad Painting throughout the early 1980's alongside artists such as Werner Büttner and Martin Kippenberger. Oehlen has moved towards abstract painting in the late 1980's, continuously redefining his own vocabulary. His first abstract paintings were notably followed by black and white computer-based paintings, collaged canvases with fragments of advertising posters and paint applied on top, Fingermalerei (Finger Paintings) in the 2000's and paintings fully covered with poster cutouts. The survey exhibition ranges from early figurative works from the 1980's till his 2018 series on a bright yellow background. Many of the works on display in the building designed by David Adjaye are monumental in scale.

The works demonstrate Oehlen's creative strength, seemingly questioning the legacy of the anterior generation of artists such as Gerhard Richter and Sigmar Polke who, like Oehlen, innovated and redefined painting.

Highlights of the show include the artist’s own version of the Rothko Chapel that features large rectangular collages, serving as a critique of our consumer societies, along Tree Paintings and Elevator Paintings.

Dialoguing with Oehlen works, pieces from his personal collection gathering artists he admires such as Martin Kippenberger, Daniel Richter or André Butzer are presented alongside works from Elham and Tony Salamé's collection which include works by Richard Prince, Christopher Wool, Etel Adnan, Fouad Elkoury, Franz West and Jana Schröder in a group show curated by the artist himself. 

Aïshti Foundation, Beirut


Julian Schnabel

Aktion Paintings 1985-2017 (solo show)
ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus
12 October 2018 - 3 March 2019

Julian Schnabel, installation view, ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus
Julian Schnabel, installation view, ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus

ARoS Aarhus Art Museum’s major special exhibition for Autumn 2018 offers a retrospective on one of American art’s great heavyweights — the American painter and film director Julian Schnabel (b. 1951).

The exhibition will be the largest presentation ever of this artist in the Nordic region and will be a sweeping tour de force of the artist’s work over several decades. The exhibition has been arranged in close collaboration with the artist himself and will show over 40 large scale works from a career spanning more than 30 years.

Julian Schnabel stands out as the most noteworthy figure in the revival of figurative and narrative painting at the start of the 1980s. A blustering neo-expressionism that emerged after painting had been disavowed for several years in favour of the 1970s more conceptual and, not least, inward-looking art forms.

Julian Schnabel began his artistic career in the US where he, together with a distinguished group of artists that included Jean-Michel Basquiat, strove to return narrative painting and the subjective to art. This had been abandoned for a long period in favour of a decidedly minimalistic and conceptual style. Known in his younger years as New York’s enfant terrible, Julian Schnabel was friends with Andy Warhol and Basquiat and their circle.

Schnabel became world renowned in the early 1980s for his enormous plate paintings that were painted on large shards of broken porcelain. Schnabel had been inspired to create these after visiting Gaudi’s Parc Güell in Barcelona, famed for its mosaic benches. Schnabel won acclaim and success for his use of unconventional and discordant materials such as smashed plates and visitors to the exhibition will encounter a wealth of varying types of painting, encompassing painted plates and old, distressed tarpaulins, canvas and photographic prints.

The exhibition has come about in close collaboration with Julian Schnabel himself and ARoS and the artist have envisaged an innovative architecture that will lead visitors on a journey around Julian Schnabel’s artistic universe.

In a Danish context, the Danish counterparts to Schnabel, De Unge Vilde, have had a substantial impact on shaping Danish art from the 1980s up to today. Danish artists of the 1980s are among the most celebrated Danish artists and their reintroduction of narrative as foundational for the painting has echoes in Danish art even today. Similarly, ARoS has for many years evinced a particular interest in the wild paintings of the 80s that comprise a large part of the museum’s permanent collection.

The neo-expressionism that Schnabel is an exponent of has founded schools of artists ever since and one can see the legacy of Julian Schnabel among young contemporary artists, both Danish and international, making Julian Schnabel more relevant than ever before.

ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus



Julian Schnabel

Orsay seen by Julian Schnabel (solo and curated show)
Musée d'Orsay, Paris
10 October 2018 - 13 January 2019

Julian Schnabel, installation view, Musée d'Orsay, Paris, 2018 © Musée d'Orsay, Paris. Photo: Sophie Boegly-Crépy
Julian Schnabel, installation view, Musée d'Orsay, Paris, 2018 © Musée d'Orsay, Paris. Photo: Sophie Boegly-Crépy

For its first invitation to a great contemporary artist, the Musée d’Orsay has asked the painter and filmmaker Julian Schnabel to give an interpretation of the collection, by presenting, in two of the museum’s historic rooms, a new scenography and a selection of works that have never previously been displayed together.

Julian Schnabel is one of the most important living artists of today. Acclaimed since the beginning of his career in the 1980s, his works can be found in the leading art museums of the world, including the MoMA in New York, the Tate in London and the Pompidou Centre in Paris, which held a solo exhibition of his work in 1987. He is also a leading film director, making films such as Basquiat (1996), Before Night Falls (2000, Grand Jury Prize at the Venice Film Festival) and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007 Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, Golden Globe for Best Director and Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival).

For this exhibition, his first in a leading French institution since the Pompidou Centre over thirty years ago, and timed to coincide with the release of a film about Van Gogh, At Eternity's Gate, the artist has chosen from the collection, works that converse - not only van Gogh and Gauguin, who feature in his film, but also Cézanne, Manet, Courbet and less well-known yet very influential artists such as Carolus-Duran and Théodule Ribot - in order to give visitors a new perspective on these works, works they have seen before but will now perceive in a new light – cast by Julian Schnabel.

In counterpoint to the works from the Musée d’Orsay’s collection, the artist will present a selection of his own paintings, demonstrating the qualities of the medium that have endured from the 19th century to today. Painted in a visual conversation with Manet or with van Gogh, they will offer a new overview of the works of a leading painter of today.

Musée d'Orsay, Paris


Albert Oehlen

As Far as the Eye Can See - New Insight into the Würth Collection (group show)
Kunsthalle Würth, Schwäbisch Hall
23 April 2018 - 17 March 2019

The Würth Collection, already rich in diversity and specific features, has nevertheless been enlarged by a wealth of exciting international acquisitions over the past ten years. An opulent selection of almost 200 works dating from the 1960s onwards are now being put on show for the public, many of them for the first time.
The main accesssions have been in the fields of painting and sculpture. The often powerful
formats by Karel Appel, Daniel Buren, Anthony Caro, Tony Cragg, Felix Droese, Antony Gormley, Peter Halley, Johannes Itten, Alex Katz, Martin Kippenberger, Per Kirkeby, Imi Knoebel, Maria Lassnig, Robert Longo, Brian O’Doherty, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Arnulf Rainer, Gerhard Richter, Antonio Saura, Sean Scully, Monika Sosnowska, Antoni Tàpies and many others reflect in many ways the complexity as well as the openness of positions in art over the past 60 years.
Whereas the art predominant in the western world in the post-war years was mainly dedicated to art forms that, freed from all figuration, tradition and representational constraints, relied solely on the inspired gesture, now artists emerged who were suspicious of precisely this supposedly ingenious artistic inspiration. While some declared painting to be dead, others took very different approaches towards a “re-vision” of painting and sculpture, which included both provocation and irony.
This did not ultimately involve some kind of empathetic return to the painterly or figurative, but rather a re-negotiation of traditionally conveyed notions of the image and the reproduction. What is more, it is a process which has still not been completed to this very day.
The exhibition is subdivided into several sections that provide exciting insight into a variety of themes ranging from Colour Field to Nature Transformed to Body Communication,
not omitting Staged Conflict Fields or The Grand Gesture. You may well be surprised!

Würth Collection


Albert Oehlen

Cows by the Water (solo show)
Palazzo Grassi, Venice
8 April 2018 - 6 January 2019

Albert Oehlen, installation view, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2018 © Palazzo Grassi, Photo: Matteo De Fina
Albert Oehlen, installation view, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, 2018 © Palazzo Grassi, Photo: Matteo De Fina

From Sunday 8 April 2018, Palazzo Grassi presents Cows by the water, a personal exhibition dedicated to German artist Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) and curated by Caroline Bourgeois.

The exhibition lays out a path dedicated to Albert Oehlen’s production through a selection of approximately 85 works, including some lesser-known ones, created between the 1980's and today. The works brought together come from the Pinault Collection as well as from other major private collections and international museums.

Cows by the water path is not chronological but rather suggests a syncopated rhythm between various genres and periods, thereby underlining the central role played by music in the artist’s practice. Music emerges as a real metaphor of his work method, where contamination and rhythm, improvisation and repetition, density and harmony of sounds become pictorial gestures.

Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) reveals himself to be a major figure of contemporary painting thanks to his artistic research in constant evolution, dedicated to experiments and to overcoming formal limits rather than to the subject represented.

The artist’s work has already be presented in exhibitions around the world, including at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana in 2017, the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2016, the New Museum in New York in 2015, the Kunstmuseum in Bonn in 2012 and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 2009. 'Cows by the water' in Venice is his largest monographic one to date.

Palazzo Grassi, Venice