clear

Rineke Dijkstra

Ecstasy (group show)
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart
29 September 2018 - 24 February 2019

Rineke Dijkstra, The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK, 2009, video still, 2009 © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK, 2009, video still, 2009 © Rineke Dijkstra

Ecstasy is one of the oldest and one of the most astounding phenomena of European and non-European cultures. Originally forged in the context of religion and ritual, the transcendental experience of ecstasy was first conceptualized in antiquity. It has been an integral part of Western social theories ever since, even as its definition and social significance have been continually modified and expanded. In indigenous cultural spaces, ecstasy generally bears positive connotations and is experienced within the context of ritual acts, but it was and is often perceived as threatening in societies dominated by industrialization, capitalism, and globalization. Here ecstasy means loss of control, and it harbors the danger of an individual or an entire collective deviating from the norm. Exceptions are transcendental experiences within religious contexts or profane ecstasies, as may be observed during sporting events, concerts, or politically motivated activities.
In its cultural significance and complexity, ecstasy also entered the visual arts and engaged in extraordinary alliances with the related disciplines of music and dance.

Beginning in the fall of 2018, the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart will, for the first time, trace these and other connections as it dedicates itself to the phenomenon of ecstasy in a large thematic exhibition. Drawing from paradigmatic examples from antiquity to the present, the exhibition illuminates the various spiritual, political, psychological, social, sexual, and aesthetic implications of euphoric and intoxicated states between asceticism and excess.

In approximately ten thematic rooms, the visitor will become familiar with the various faces of
ecstasy and with the shifting social significance of mind-altering states as it changed over the
centuries. In so doing, it will also consider how different cultural spheres handle the phenomenon of ecstasy. With art at its foundation, the exhibition will introduce the viewer to the various ways that artists have approached ecstatic states—from pictorial representations to video and installation works to kinesthetic experiences. The visitor may therefore not only comprehend but also experience the relevance and historical development of ecstasy. Music plays a central role here, as it unifies transcendental experience in all cultures. Rhythmic sounds, repetitive movements, and visual stimuli prepare the groundwork for reaching a state of »being beside oneself.«

Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart


Additional:

Rineke Dijkstra

Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature (group show)
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
1 March - 26 May 2019

The major exhibition Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the unmistakable influence that Vincent van Gogh had on the work of David Hockney (1937). On view from 1 March to 26 May 2019.
Visitors learn about both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright colours and their experimentation with perspective. Hockney’s monumental Yorkshire landscapes play a central role.
The exhibition Hockney - Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature features some 120 works, including highlights such as the imposing The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire (2011) from the Centre Pompidou collection, Hockney’s intimate sketchbooks and his iPad drawings. Photographer Rineke Dijkstra created a portrait of the artist, who is now 81 years old, especially for this exhibition.

Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam


Rineke Dijkstra

RE-VISIONS (group show)
Pinakothek der Moderne - Sammlung Moderne Kunst, Munich
28 February - 17 November 2019

For more than four decades Ann and Jürgen Wilde have been compiling their unique collection of modern and contemporary photography, which has been affiliated with the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen since 2010, as the Ann and Jürgen Wilde Foundation. Works by photographers like Aenne Biermann, Florence Henri, and Germaine Krull lie at the collection’s core. The program at Galerie Wilde (1972–1985), which was the only gallery in Germany to specialize in photography at the time of its founding, was also innovative for including female photographers, among them Jan Groover, Marcia Resnick, Gwenn Thomas, and Deborah Turbeville. To this day, Ann Wilde remains particularly interested in promoting and acquiring work made by female artists and photographers. On the occasion of her birthday, the donor is opening her private collection to the public for the first time. Re-visions presents photographs that speak to Ann Wilde personally: work from the 1920s up to the present, made by artists like Johanna Diehl, Rineke Dijkstra, Marie Jo Lafontaine, Barbara Probst, Alexandra Ranner, Judith Joy Ross, Martina Sauter, Eva-Maria Schön, Kathrin Sonntag, and Heidi Specker.

Pinakothek der Moderne - Sammlung Moderne Kunst, Munich


Rineke Dijkstra

Treasury! Masterpieces from the Hermitage (group show)
Hermitage, Amsterdam
2 February - 25 August 2019

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra

The tenth anniversary of the Hermitage Amsterdam will trigger a year-long celebration in 2019. The initial event will be Treasury!, the first of the two anniversary exhibitions, featuring a cross-section of masterpieces from the entire collection of the St Petersburg State Hermitage. Including big names in art history like Bernini, Da Vinci, Fabre, Matisse, Rembrandt and Velázquez. Also on show are outstanding works of art from cultures dating back to early prehistory (23,000 BC) and from Ancient Egypt, Classical Greece and Rome; as well as antiquities from civilisations as far afield as Siberia, the Middle East and East-Asia. In the main gallery, below a spectacular piece of light art, you will enjoy thrilling combinations of works from widely differing times and places. What, for example, links Maarten van Heemskerck’s sixteenth-century Calvary triptych with an image of the Buddha made in twelfth-century China? To find out, visit Treasury!

Hermitage, Amsterdam


Rineke Dijkstra, Navid Nuur, Michael Raedecker

Freedom - The Fifty Key Dutch Artworks Since 1968 (group show)
Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle
19 January - 12 May 2019

An exhibition entitled Freedom – The Fifty Key Dutch Artworks Since 1968 will open at Museum de Fundatie in Zwolle on 19 January 2019. This ambitious and somewhat unconventional project will feature the fifty ‘key artworks’, the leading works produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years. Freedom will be deliberately subjective, intended both as an invitation to debate and as a declaration of love for Dutch art. As such, Freedom will be unmissable for anyone who wants to see all the top art produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years brought together in one show.

Freedom is being curated by art critic and author Hans den Hartog Jager (b. 1968). He has created a number of other exhibitions for Museum de Fundatie: More Light (2010) about the sublime in contemporary art, More Power (2014) about the possibility or impossibility of artists influencing processes in society and Behold the Man (2016), a portrait gallery that presented an overview both of social change and of developments in art over the past hundred years.

In these times of fragmentation, when the meaning of many things that for decades were taken for granted in the Netherlands is being called into question, we want to show the essential power of art: to open up new vistas, to challenge entrenched values, ethical standards and forms, and to reflect and anticipate the spirit of the age. That is why we have opted for ‘freedom’ as the underlying theme. This word has acquired a curious, almost populist political overtone in the Netherlands in recent years. Fifty years ago ‘freedom’ denoted the revolutionary developments that were breaking out of existing patterns, but now it has come to symbolise clinging to ‘authentic Dutch values’. At the same time, it is easy to maintain that a quest for freedom, independence and uniqueness has remained a core value of contemporary art throughout this period.

With the deliberate, almost classic choice of fifty ‘crucial’ works, we hope to highlight the main elements that constantly recur in the current debate. Art should unashamedly show what it can contribute to ideas, what a unique role it can play in society, whether it be a matter of the importance of a tradition (artistic or otherwise), the way in which art represents national identity, or the degree to which it reflects changing relationships in society. However, just as important is the fact that the exhibition will set out to show visitors how much fantastic art has been produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years, from Jan Dibbets’ Perspective Correction (1968) to Ria van Eyks My Woven Diary (1976-77), from René Daniels’ Aux Déon (1985) to Natasja Kensmil’s Self-portrait with Cross (1999) and from Guido van der Werve’s Number Eight: Everything Is Going To Be Alright (2009) to Melanie Bonajo’s Night Soil #1 (2016). For decades, art in the Netherlands has been strong, vibrant and free – and it is time to put it firmly in the spotlight.

By bringing so many ‘key artworks’ of the past few decades together, we hope to re-energise the debate on the role of art in society. Ultimately, however, we hope above all that Freedom will be a celebration of the power of art, with an exhibition and a book designed to bring pleasure, inform and provoke thought, so important in the world today.

Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle