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Darren Almond, Thomas Struth et al.

Wilderness (group show)
Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt
1 November 2018 - 3 February 2019

Darren Almond, Fullmoon@Cerro Chaltén, 2013 © Darren Almond
Darren Almond, Fullmoon@Cerro Chaltén, 2013 © Darren Almond

The wilderness returns to art! And it does so at a time when the blank spaces on the world map have largely disappeared and an “untouched natural state” virtually only exists in the form of areas designated as nature reserves. The search for the last open spaces, the expedition as an artistic medium, and post-human visions of a world devoid of people characterize the works of many contemporary artists alongside the renegotiation of the relationship between individual and beast. The SCHIRN is dedicating an extensive thematic exhibition to this recurring fascination and presents works of art from 1900 to the present. With important pieces by some 30 artists – inlcuding Tacita Dean, Mark Dion, Jean Dubuf­fet, Max Ernst, Asger Jorn, Geor­gia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, Frank Stella, Thomas Struth, Henri Rous­seau und Carle­ton E. Watkins – it not only sheds light on the phenomenon of the wilderness in terms of iconography, but also shows it as a principle and motor of artistic creative work. Artists have repeatedly been drawn to that which is wild, untamed, uncultivated since the beginning of the aesthetic modern age. The “wilderness” has always also served as a projection surface for anything that was different and foreign, for the longing for a primordial life beyond the boundaries of civilization. In today’s “Anthropocene,” the utopia of a natural state remote from culture and human influence seems anachronistic. And yet the examination of traditional images and fictions of wilderness seems more alive than ever before.

Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt


Additional:

Thomas Struth

Titian and the Renaissance in Venice (group show)
Städel Museum, Frankfurt
13 February – 26 May 2019

Thomas Struth, Galleria dell’Accademia 1, Venedig 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Galleria dell’Accademia 1, Venedig 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth

In the spring of 2019, the Städel Museum will devote itself to one of the most momentous chapters in the history of European art: Venetian Renaissance painting. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, the artists of the lagoon city – first and foremost the young Titian (ca. 1488/90–1576) – developed an independent strain of the Renaissance relying on purely painterly means and the impact of light and colour. This new approach caused a sensation in Venice, and its exponents were soon spreading the innovations outside the city republic as well. In the 1540s, yet another highly talented young generation – now embodied by Jacopo Tintoretto and Paolo Veronese – came on the scene to vie for commissions in Venice.

In its various sections the exhibition introduces selected characteristic aspects of Venetian painting from the sixteenth century – for example the atmospherically charged landscape depictions that heralded landscape painting as a genre in its own right, the ideal likenesses of beautiful women (“Belle Donne”), or the importance of colour for the art of the Venetians. With more than a hundred masterworks from international collections, the show is the first in Germany to present a first-rate, thematically structured panorama of Venetian Renaissance painting.

The large-scale exhibition features more than twenty examples by Titian alone – the figure who held the key position in the Venetian art scene all his life – and thus the most extensive selection of his works ever before on display in Germany. It also presents works by Giovanni Bellini (ca. 1435–1516), Jacopo Palma il Vecchio (1479/80–1528), Sebastiano del Piombo (ca. 1485–1547), Lorenzo Lotto (ca. 1480–1556/57), Jacopo Tintoretto (ca. 1518/19–1594) and Paolo Veronese (1528–1588). The exhibition offers comprehensive insights into the artistic and thematic spectrum of the Renaissance in Venice and elucidates why so many widely differing artists of later centuries looked back to works of this period again and again for orientation.

Städel Museum, Frankfurt


Thomas Struth

Nature & Politics (solo show)
MAST Foundation, Bologna
2 February - 22 April 2019

Thomas Struth, Sorghum, Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis 2017, 2017 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Sorghum, Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis 2017, 2017 © Thomas Struth

The MAST Foundation presents a selection of large colour photographs taken by Thomas Struth from 2007 on at industrial sites and scientific research centres throughout the world that represent cutting-edge technological experimentation and innovation.

One of the best known artist on the international scene, Struth takes us in realms and forbidden zones to which we do not normally have access, giving us a glimpse into the unexplored world behind technological innovation in 25 large-format works on display at the MAST PhotoGallery. Space research labs, nuclear power plants, operating rooms, and drilling platforms are photographed with painstaking precision, detached curiosity, and a remarkable visual sensibility.

The artist focuses on machines as tools transforming contemporary society and shows us scientific, highly technological experiments, developments, research, calibrations and interventions that will at some point, directly or not, intrude into our lives and have an impact. In these images we perceive all the complexity, importance, and force of the processes, but we can also sense the power and the politics of knowledge, and the business they conceal.

MAST Foundation, Bologna


Darren Almond

The Gifts of Tony Podesta (group show)
American University Museum, Washington
26 January - 17 March 2019

This first major exhibition drawn from our Corcoran Legacy Collection features strong and provocative photography and sculpture donated by Tony Podesta over the past decade to the Corcoran Gallery of Art, now part of the American University Museum’s holdings. Podesta has earned the reputation of being a fearless supporter of challenging contemporary art by women. He is an important patron of the arts nationally and internationally, with an outsized impact all across the Washington art world.

American University Museum, Washington