clear

Jeff Koons

The Dog: A celebration at Chatsworth (group show)
Chatsworth House, Chatsworth
23 March - 6 October 2019

This exhibition, conceived by the Duchess of Devonshire, explores the Cavendish family’s enduring love for dogs, through paintings, drawings, sculpture, letters, photographs and contemporary art. We’ve sniffed out all of our favourite stories, capturing the idiosyncratic, faithful, endearing and playful character of man’s best friend.

Ranging from historic to present day pieces, specially selected loans from public and private collections will be presented alongside items from the Devonshire Collection, featuring everything from working dogs to woven dogs, dogs on canvas to dogs on camera and from puppets to popular culture.

Star works from Constable, Stubbs, Gainsborough and Landseer sit beside contemporary pieces by Lucian Freud, Jeff Koons, Antony Gormley, Elisabeth Frink and a specially commissioned eight metre high scaffold dog created by Ben Long complete the dogs in art line-up.

Chatsworth House, Chatsworth


Additional:

Jeff Koons et al.

Hybrid Sculpture. Contemporary sculpture from the collection of the Stedelijk Museum (group show)
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
23 March 2019 – 12 January 2020

Jeff Koons, Mound of Flowers No. 1, 1991. Glass. Collection of Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
Jeff Koons, Mound of Flowers No. 1, 1991. Glass. Collection of Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Hybrid Sculpture presents a selection of work from the collection that reveals how radically sculpture has changed since 1990. The exhibition features more than twenty pieces by nineteen artists, most of them large-scale works.

The title Hybrid Sculpture refers to the fact that almost none of the works looks like a sculpture in the traditional sense: the artists blur the boundaries between sculpture and painting, performance, video art and design. Some of the artworks have never been shown in the museum before. For the artists in Hybrid Sculpture, the aim is not to create a ‘pure’ sculpture informed by the classic sculptural properties such as volume and space. Instead, their practice centres around combining a variety of media and appropriating objects from pop culture and everyday life, transforming them by changing their size, colour or material.

Stedelijk Museum


Jeff Koons, Albert Oehlen et al.

FOREVER YOUNG — 10 Jahre Museum Brandhorst (group show)
Museum Brandhorst, Munich
24 May 2019 - 26 April 2020

Installation view, 2019, © Museum Brandhorst / Bayerische Staatsgemaeldesammlungen Munich, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff.  Albert Oehlen, Selbstportrait mit Pferd, 1985. Oil on canvas, 160 x 130 cm. Udo und Anette Brandhorst Sammlung
Installation view, 2019, © Museum Brandhorst / Bayerische Staatsgemaeldesammlungen Munich, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff.
Albert Oehlen, Selbstportrait mit Pferd, 1985. Oil on canvas, 160 x 130 cm. Udo und Anette Brandhorst Sammlung

The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for an exhibition of its expanded collection. “Forever Young – 10 Years Museum Brandhorst” traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to present day art production, and combines many new acquisitions of recent years with the collection’s more familiar highlights.
 
The exhibition includes some 250 works by 44 artists and has three main themes: The first is Pop art, and especially its often overlooked political dimension. The second strand is dedicated to the thorny topic of subjectivity in the present day—and therefore also the question of how late capitalism influences identities. The third section turns to one of the Museum Brandhorst’s key strengths: Contemporary painting and the issue of how this traditional artistic genre renews itself time and again. With “Painting 2.0: Painting in the Information Age” the museum has formulated important theses on this in recent years, and continued it in many well respected individual exhibitions, such as “Wade Guyton: The New York Studio”, “Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation” and “Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame”. Especially for the anniversary, the gallery presenting Twombly’s rose paintings can be seen once again in its original form as envisaged by the artist. A prominent new acquisition is also presented from his very last work series, “Camino Real”, 2011. With its red, yellow and orange loops on a bright-green background, the painting ranks among Twombly’s most color-intensive works from a career spanning more than 60 years.
 
The exhibition is on display from May 24, 2019 to April 2020, and is accompanied by a diverse public program with lectures, talks, workshops, exhibition tours and performances.


Museum Brandhorst


Jeff Koons et al.

1989 - culture and politics (group show)
Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
5 September 2019 - 12 January 2020

This autumn, Nationalmuseum features an exhibition on one of the most dramatic moments in history – the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. The exhibition, which opens on 5 September, takes a broad look at what happened within the visual culture during the upheavals of 1989. Global outlooks, Swedish perspectives and high politics meet mundane everyday life in an array of documentary photography, portraits, posters, videos and designs.

The Berlin Wall fell on 9 November 1989. The Cold War came to an end and the struggle between liberal capitalism and communism seemed to be over. Eastern Europe was not, however, the only place on earth shaken by political drama. The South African apartheid regime collapsed and on the Tiananmen Square in China, student demonstrations ended with a massacre.

The collapse of communism in Eastern Europe is often seen as the start of global capitalism. Globalisation did not, however, occur only in the field of economics. In 1989, the concept of a World Wide Web was coined at the same time as the first pocket sized mobile telephone was launched. The third edition of the Havana Biennial in 1989 is often described as a milestone in the development towards a globalisation of contemporary art. The late 1980s was also marked by a global tragedy. AIDS, spreading like an epidemic across the world, became a much feared disease.
At the turn of the decades of the 80s and 90s, conflicts about freedom of speech, religious and ethical values flared up in many places. The Iranian leader Khomeini issued a death sentence against Salman Rushdie whilst images by Robert Mapplethorpe caused outrage and protests in the USA. In Sweden, charges were brought against Horst Schröder, publisher of the adult comics magazine ‘POX’, for illegal depictions of violence.

Against this backdrop of social development and political drama, the 1989 exhibition dives into the scene of visual culture at the turn of the 80s and 90s. Global outlooks and Swedish perspectives alternate. High politics meet mundane everyday life – illustrated in the form of political resistance posters from Hungary and former Czechoslovakia, pictures of Mexican immigrants on the border to the United States, modernist furniture designs, abortion rights activism, kitsch aesthetics, music videos and restaurant interiors. Conceptually, the exhibition revolves around notions such as freedom versus lack of freedom, borders versus borderless.

The exhibition includes documentary photography, portraits, posters, videos and designs by artists, photographers and designers such as Richard Avedon, Ron Arad, Cecilia Edefalk, Nan Goldin, Willliam Kentridge, Barbara Kruger, Boris Mikhailov, Tracey Moffatt, Ingrid Orfali, Ingegerd Råman, Philippe Starck, Lars Tunbjörk, Pia Wallén and Andres Serrano. A book with texts by Per Hedström, Anna Charlotta Gunnarson, Kalle Lind, Estelle af Malmborg, Sara Kristoffersson and Andreas Johansson Heinö is also being launched in connection with the exhibition.

The 1989 – Culture and Politics exhibition will run from 5 September 2019 until 12 January 2020. The exhibition is curated by Per Hedström, Director of Exhibitions at the Nationalmuseum, Lena Eriksson, Head of Education at the Nationalmuseum, Estelle af Malmborg, Independent Curator and Sara Kristoffersson, Professor of Design History.



Nationalmuseum, Stockholm


Jeff Koons et al.

POP Power from Warhol to Koons, Masterworks from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation
Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke
28 September 2019 - 8 March 2020

From Campbell’s Soup to Mickey Mouse, and from comic strips to balloon dogs, POP Power celebrates a perennial movement that revels in the new and the now, the celebrity and the commodity, and art made accessible for the masses. Seminal works from the original Pop Art masters such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and James Rosenquist are paired alongside today’s leading Neo-Pop provocateurs such as Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst and Takashi Murakami, providing a fun, irreverent look at the low brow, high art of our popular culture.

With the creations of American Neo-Pop artist Jeff Koons and his English counterpart Damien Hirst fetching some of the world’s highest auction prices for a living artist, the aesthetics and approaches of Pop art have demonstrated a unique staying power, in contrast to other major post-World War II movements like Abstract Expressionism or Minimalism.

POP Power from Warhol to Koons: Masterworks from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation explores the continuing relevance of Pop art by featuring select works from the nation’s largest private collection of prints and multiples, which now numbers over 13,000 works and comprises one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of prints by Pop legend Andy Warhol.

POP Power focuses on leading contemporary figures such as Koons, Hirst, and the Japanese master of the Neo-Pop Superflat style, Takashi Murakami, yet includes a number of key pieces by seminal American Pop leaders Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist, and Robert Indiana, as well as the French-American and Swedish-American Pop sculptors Niki de Saint Phalle and Claes Oldenburg, who is still actively working. 


Likewise, counted among the principal group of Neo-Pop artists is Keith Haring, who befriended Warhol in the 1980s and popularized graffiti art before dying at the young age of thirty-one.

Other Neo-Pop artists at the center of the exhibition are Julian Opie from England and the Americans Donald Baechler, Donald Sultan, and Richard Prince.

The inclusion of works from the original period of Pop art, which came into its own in America in the 1960s, provides meaningful context for the contemporary Neo-Pop expressions that constitute the core of the exhibition.

For instance, Warhol’s forays into the realms of artistic celebrity and art-cum-commodity lie at the heart of the success strategies of Koons, Hirst, and Murakami.

On another level, Lichtenstein’s hallmark style derived from comic strips holds analogies with both Opie’s characteristic simplifications produced by computer-software manipulation of photographs and Murakami’s Superflat aesthetic associated with Japanese manga and anime.

A special feature of POP Power will be the juxtaposition of individual Pop and Neo-Pop works, which not only contextualizes the latter but also encourages fresh understandings of the former. In this regard, Warhol’s ghostly screenprint of Marilyn Monroe in reversed black-and-white, created about 1978, takes on enhanced meaning next to Hirst’s photogravure etching of a bejeweled skull, the 2008 Memento: Victory over Death.

Curated by the Taubman Museum of Art’s Deputy Director of Exhibitions and Education Dr. Patrick Shaw Cable, this major ticketed exhibition provides new insight into contemporary Neo-Pop art, its diverse manifestations, and its grounding in and evolution from original Pop art.

The exhibition includes many new acquisitions by collector Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Schnitzer Family Foundation of the work of Koons and other artists.

In addition to regularly sharing works with institutions across the country, the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation is committed to sponsoring innovative art educational programs, which the Taubman will be planning around POP Power.



Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke


Jeff Koons

Le Rêve D´être Artiste (group show)
Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille
20 September 2019 - 6 January 2020


Jeff Koons

Appearance Stripped Bare: Desire and the Object in the Work of Marcel Duchamp and Jeff Koons, Even (dual show)
Fundación Jumex, Mexico
19 May - 29 September 2019

Jeff Koons, One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J Silver Series), 1985 © Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons, One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J Silver Series), 1985 © Jeff Koons

The exhibition overlays the work of Marcel Duchamp and Jeff Koons—two of the most influential artists of the twentieth century—to address key concepts about objects, commodities, desires, and the artist’s relationship to society.

The first major exhibition to bring together these two legendary artists, Appearance Stripped Bare places the work of Koons and Duchamp side by side, as in a hall of mirrors that reflects, distorts, and amplifies the artists’ similarities and differences within a complex “regime of coincidences,” to borrow one of Duchamp’s peculiar expressions.

Fundación Jumex, Mexico


Jeff Koons

The Elephant in the Room. Sculptures of the Marx Collection and of the Collection of the Nationalgalerie (group show)
Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin
1 November 2018 - 29 September 2019

Jeff Koons, New Shop-Vac Wet/Dry, 1980 © Jeff Koons / Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Marx / Jochen Littkemann
Jeff Koons, New Shop-Vac Wet/Dry, 1980 © Jeff Koons / Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie, Sammlung Marx / Jochen Littkemann

The Elephant in the Room – Sculptures of the Marx Collection and of the Collection of the Nationalgalerie on display at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin addresses an essential aspect of sculpture from the 1960s: the spatial effect of sculptures. With works by Absalon, Joseph Beuys, Donald Judd, Jeff Koons, Rachel Whiteread and others the exhibition focuses on the relationship between works of art and spatiality. Drawn from the English expression, “the elephant in the room”, the elephant in the exhibition title refers to those forces and factors that despite their not being an integral part of the sculptures exert their presence in the exhibition space and are thus an essential component of an expanded concept of art that originated in the 1960s.

Staatliche Museen zu Berlin