clear

Jeff Koons, Albert Oehlen et al.

FOREVER YOUNG — 10 Jahre Museum Brandhorst (group show)
Museum Brandhorst, Munich
24 May 2019 - 26 April 2020

Installation view, 2019, © Museum Brandhorst / Bayerische Staatsgemaeldesammlungen Munich, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff.  Albert Oehlen, Selbstportrait mit Pferd, 1985. Oil on canvas, 160 x 130 cm. Udo und Anette Brandhorst Sammlung
Installation view, 2019, © Museum Brandhorst / Bayerische Staatsgemaeldesammlungen Munich, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff.
Albert Oehlen, Selbstportrait mit Pferd, 1985. Oil on canvas, 160 x 130 cm. Udo und Anette Brandhorst Sammlung

The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for an exhibition of its expanded collection. “Forever Young – 10 Years Museum Brandhorst” traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to present day art production, and combines many new acquisitions of recent years with the collection’s more familiar highlights.
 
The exhibition includes some 250 works by 44 artists and has three main themes: The first is Pop art, and especially its often overlooked political dimension. The second strand is dedicated to the thorny topic of subjectivity in the present day—and therefore also the question of how late capitalism influences identities. The third section turns to one of the Museum Brandhorst’s key strengths: Contemporary painting and the issue of how this traditional artistic genre renews itself time and again. With “Painting 2.0: Painting in the Information Age” the museum has formulated important theses on this in recent years, and continued it in many well respected individual exhibitions, such as “Wade Guyton: The New York Studio”, “Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation” and “Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame”. Especially for the anniversary, the gallery presenting Twombly’s rose paintings can be seen once again in its original form as envisaged by the artist. A prominent new acquisition is also presented from his very last work series, “Camino Real”, 2011. With its red, yellow and orange loops on a bright-green background, the painting ranks among Twombly’s most color-intensive works from a career spanning more than 60 years.
 
The exhibition is on display from May 24, 2019 to April 2020, and is accompanied by a diverse public program with lectures, talks, workshops, exhibition tours and performances.


Museum Brandhorst


Additional:

Jeff Koons

Absolute Value / From the Collection of Marie and Jose Mugrabi (solo show)
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv
10 March – 10 October 2020

Regarded by many as the most important, influential, popular, and controversial living artist in the world, Jeff Koons is a unique cultural phenomenon, whose resonances and influences extend far beyond the confines of the art world.

Koons (born 1955, York, Pennsylvania, USA) is the foremost of the American Neo-Pop artists who emerged in the 1980s and explored the meaning of art and spectacle in a media-saturated era, while adopting an aesthetics that accentuates the consumption culture that came to the fore at this time. The exhibition presents a selection of large-scale works from different periods in Koons’s career, from the 1980s to the present. The works are from the artist’s most renowned series, spanning his diverse spectrum of mediums and techniques.

Koons’s work undercuts the division between “good taste” and “bad taste,” mixing together “high” with “low” culture and kitsch. He continues the trajectory of 1960s Pop artists by making — with unprecedented intensity — an incriminating and fetishistic connection between art and the world of commodities. In his early career, Koons operated within the tradition started by Marcel Duchamp, presenting readymade objects, such as vacuum cleaners and basketballs, within illuminated display cases — thereby elevating commercial and domestic objects and highlighting the allure of new products. Later on in his career, various colorful kitsch images replaced the industrial products: puppies, flowers, teddy-bears, piglets, or other playthings made of porcelain or wood by craftsmen on Koons’ behalf. Koons further developed his practice of appropriating imagery from popular culture by inflating simple objects to huge dimensions in stainless steel, marble, or other materials. Other sculptures featured, in overblown extravagance, celebrities (such as Michael Jackson and Lady Gaga), inflatable pool toys, or cartoon characters (such as Popeye and the Hulk — themselves figures of bulging masculinity). These works were produced with extreme perfectionism, giving them an almost religious aura and rendering them highly coveted objects of desire for art collectors and the general public alike.

Absolute value is a mathematical concept, denoting size in numerical terms: the absolute value of a number is the distance between it and the zero point on the number axis. The use of this notion in the exhibition’s title raises the question of value as a fundamental notion in Koons’s art, and highlights the long controversy over the attribution of value (or lack thereof) to artistic objects (echoing the question of “Is it art?” asked with regard to Duchamp’s Fountain, which is a standard urinal). The concept also finds expression in Koons’s practice of merging together symbolic value and economic value, thereby creating an arena in which one cannot – and possibly shouldn’t — tell them apart. Not least, the title reflects a search for an imaginary distance (absolute value) within the span of art history, of which Koons’s art is both a part and deviation.

The “Jeff Koons phenomenon” precedes Jeff Koons’s actual works and the physical encounter with them. There are few artists whose works are so etched into the collective cultural memory that an encounter with any single artwork of theirs is suffused with associations of all the others. The title therefore posits Koons himself — the artist and the phenomenon — as an axiom of contemporary art: a controversial artist, who is also a phenomenon that cannot be dismissed, a genius, and a symbol of an era.

Tel Aviv Museum of Art


Albert Oehlen et al.

Writing the History of the Future (The ZKM Collection) (group show)
ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe
From 23 February 2019

Das 30jährige Bestehen des ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe ist der Anlass, mit seiner Sammlung, die als eine der wichtigsten Medienkunstsammlungen der Welt gilt, die Geschichte der Kunst im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert neu zu erzählen. Mit über 500 Objekten zeigt die Ausstellung erstmals die Vielfalt der Künste im medialen Wandel. Sie umfasst Fotografie, Grafik, Malerei und Skulptur ebenso wie computerbasierte Werke, Film, Holografie, Kinetische Kunst, Op-Art, Sound Art, visuelle Poesie und Videokunst.

Das 20. Jahrhundert erlebte eine radikale Transformation des Bildes durch die apparativen Medien. Beginnend mit dem Skandal der Fotografie, der darin bestand, dass Bilder sich quasi selbst herstellen, haben die Medien den „Gesamtcharakter der Kunst verändert“ (Walter Benjamin). Fotografie, Film, Fernsehen, Video, Computer und Internet haben das Verhältnis von Künstler, Werk und Betrachter sowie unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen neu bestimmt. Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht beispielhaft den Wandel der Kunst angesichts der sich verändernden apparativen Produktions-, Rezeptions- und Distributionstechnologien deutlich. Sie zeigt auch, wie KünstlerInnen mediale und soziale Praktiken vorwegnehmen, die erst Jahre später für die gesamte Gesellschaft selbstverständlich werden. Sie schreiben, wie der Titel der Ausstellung sagt, die Geschichte der Zukunft.

Durch die alle Gattungen und Medien übergreifende Perspektive eröffnet die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future auf über 6.000 qm einen neuen Blick auf die Kunst des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts. Diese Epoche rasanten technologischen Wandels durch elektronische und digitale Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien leitete eine nie gekannte Demokratisierung von Kunst und Kultur ein. Writing the History of the Future macht nachvollziehbar, wie das Versprechen der Fotografie, die Abbildung der Welt zu individualisieren, in den 1960er-Jahren von den AktivistInnen der Videokunst nochmals eingelöst wurde. Mit der plötzlich verfügbaren Videotechnik bildeten sie Welten ab, die weder im Fernsehen noch von der Filmindustrie gezeigt wurden und entwickelten eine Ästhetik, die noch heute unsere visuelle Kultur beeinflusst. Die Erweiterung der technischen Trägermedien des Bildes, vom Tafelbild zum Bildschirm, hat die Kunst in einer neuen visuellen Kultur aufgelöst, Massenkultur und Hochkultur verschränkt. Mit der Verbreitung der Computertechnik in den 1950er-Jahren wandelte sich unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen, begann die Automatisierung und Algorithmisierung der Künste. Der zeichenverarbeitende Apparat provozierte Diskussionen wie sie heute im Hinblick auf die Künstliche Intelligenz aufs Neue geführt werden. Elektronische Medien veränderten auch die Wahrnehmung und die Erzeugung des Klangs im 20. Jahrhunderts. Bisher illegitime Klänge und Geräusche wurden zu einem Medium der bildenden Kunst, zur Sound Art.

Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht deutlich, wie grundlegend Apparate das Verhältnis zum Kunstwerk verändert haben – sowohl im Hinblick auf die Produktion als auch auf die Rezeption. Die Erzeugung von Kunst konzentriert sich nicht mehr allein auf das Subjekt des Künstlers bzw. der Künstlerin, sondern inkludiert diverse Aktanten, seien es Apparate oder Menschen. Durch die Entwicklung der partizipativen, interaktiven und performativen Künste, von bewegten Bildern zu den bewegten BetrachterInnen, entstehen seit den 1960er- Jahren offene Werke, welche die BesucherInnen einer Ausstellung nicht allein zum Betrachten, sondern zum Handeln auffordern.

Die Sammlungspräsentation, für die aus 9.500 Werken ausgewählt wurde, zeichnet sich durch ihre gattungsüberschreitende Inszenierung aus. Sie zeigt den Wandel der Gattung Porträt, der Darstellung des Körpers, des Landschaftsbildes und der Architektur vom Gemälde zur interaktiven Computerinstallation. Sie zeigt die Aktualisierung des Urmediums Schrift sowie der Kunst als Format des kollektiven und individuellen Gedächtnisses unter den Bedingungen der Informationstechnologie. Die Ausstellung präsentiert somit eine Kunst radikaler Zeitgenossenschaft, d.h. eine Kunst, in der KünstlerInnen die Gegenwart mit den technischen Medien ihrer Zeit reflektieren. Sie bietet eine einmalige Gelegenheit, mit zum Teil raumgreifenden Installationen und zahlreichen Inkunablen der Medienkunst, einen umfassenden Überblick über die eigentliche Entwicklung der Kunst im 20. Jahrhundert jenseits von Malerei und Skulptur zu gewinnen.

Writing the History of the Future ist nicht allein eine Sammlung von Objekten, sondern auch eine Versammlung von Subjekten. Lounges laden ein, sich zusammenzusetzen und über das Gesehene mit Freunden und Familie auszutauschen, im Ackerspace treffen sich Interessierte zu Workshops und Seminaren. Im BÄM-Lab, dem Maker-Space des ZKM wird gemeinsam experimentiert.

Die Ausstellung ist ein Erlebnis- und Denkraum, in dem das Publikum angeregt wird, an der Geschichte der Zukunft mitzuschreiben.

ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe


Albert Oehlen

Jonathan Meese, Albert Oehlen, Daniel Richter. Works from the Hall Collection (group show)
Hall Art Foundation | Schloss Derneburg Museum, Holle
April 2019 – October 2020

Albert Oehlen, Conduction 11, 2011. Courtesy Hall Art Foundation © Albert Oehlen
Albert Oehlen, Conduction 11, 2011. Courtesy Hall Art Foundation © Albert Oehlen

The Hall Art Foundation is pleased to announce a group exhibition, Jonathan Meese, Albert Oehlen, Daniel Richter: Works from the Hall Collection, to be held at its Schloss Derneburg location. Organized in collaboration with the artists, the exhibition will include over fifty paintings, sculptures and works on paper by Jonathan Meese, Albert Oehlen and Daniel Richter from the Hall and Hall Art Foundation collections.

Hall Art Foundation