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Bridget Riley et al.

Barbara Hepworth: Art & Life (group show)
The Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield
21 May – 27 February 2022

The Hepworth Wakefield, West Yorkshire, photo: Iwan Baan
The Hepworth Wakefield, West Yorkshire, photo: Iwan Baan

In summer 2021, to mark The Hepworth Wakefield’s 10th anniversary, the gallery will organise the largest exhibition of Barbara Hepworth’s work since the artist’s death in 1975.

The exhibition will present an in-depth view of the Wakefield-born artist’s life, interests, work and legacy. It will display some of Hepworth’s most celebrated sculptures including the modern abstract carving that launched her career in the 1920s and 1930s, her iconic strung sculptures of the 1940s and 1950s, and large-scale bronze and carved sculptures from later in her career. Key loans from national public collections will be shown alongside works from private collections that have not been on public display since the 1970s, and rarely seen drawings, paintings and fabric designs. It will reveal how Hepworth’s wide sphere of interests comprising music, dance, science, space exploration, politics and religion, as well as events in her personal life, influenced her work.

Contemporary artists Tacita Dean and Veronica Ryan have been commissioned to create new works which will be presented within the exhibition. Each artist will explore themes and ideas that interested Hepworth and that continue to resonate with their own work. Art works by Bridget Riley from the 1960s will also be presented in dialogue with Hepworth’s work from the same period.

The Hepworth Wakefield


Additional:

Inge Mahn, Bridget Riley et al.

NOTHINGTOSEENESS - Void/White/Silence (group show)
Akademie der Künste, Berlin
15 September – 12 December 2021

Image: Inge Mahn, Stuhlkreis, 2000, photo: def image
Image: Inge Mahn, Stuhlkreis, 2000, photo: def image

The broad spectrum of meaning of the colour white, of void and silence in the visual arts, and the associated difference between materiality and immateriality, is at the focus of the exhibition and event project featuring international artists in the Akademie der Künste at Hanseatenweg. The aim is to explore artistic/aesthetic practices from the 1950s/60s until the present day that have brought about critical and process-based artistic positioning at international level in selected circles. The focus is on the “question of seeing (...), the visual non-slipping” (John Cage, 1961). In addition to colour, material, void, and silence, the exhibition and the accompanying programme will reference themes of keeping silent and narration in literature, performance, music and architecture. Works by Inge Mahn and Bridget Riley are included.


Akademie der Künste


Bridget Riley

Intervals 1, 2019
recently acquired by the National Gallery of Ireland

Installation view: Bridget Riley, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, September – October 2020, photo: def image, work © Bridget Riley 2020. All rights reserved
Installation view: Bridget Riley, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, September – October 2020, photo: def image, work © Bridget Riley 2020. All rights reserved

We are pleased to announce that Bridget Riley's Intervals 1, 2019, is now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland. 

National Gallery of Ireland


Bridget Riley et al.

Living with art. Picasso to Celmins (group show)

Bridget Riley, Greys (red and turquoise), 1967. Courtesy of the British Museum. © Bridget Riley 2021. All rights reserved.
Bridget Riley, Greys (red and turquoise), 1967. Courtesy of the British Museum. © Bridget Riley 2021. All rights reserved.

Spanning almost one hundred years of modern art, this exhibition will showcase highlights from the wide-ranging collection of Alexander Walker (1930–2003), longstanding film critic for London's Evening Standard newspaper and prolific collector of modern and contemporary prints and drawings.

In life, Walker surrounded himself with works from his collection in all rooms of his Maida Vale flat including his kitchen and bathroom.

He bought works of art for pleasure rather than financial gain and generously left his collection of over 200 works on paper to the British Museum when he died. This is the first exhibition in over 10 years to showcase the art through the lens of his collection.

The exhibition will include 30 prints and drawings by artists ranging from Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to Lucian Freud, Bridget Riley, David Hockney and Vija Celmins. It will demonstrate Walker's interest in artists' working methods and in transitional pieces that show an artist developing a new style or subject, or experimenting with a new technique.

The exhibition aims to trace the development of 20th-century art in Europe and America through key pieces in Walker's collection, which he viewed as a record of his own art-historical education. It will also demonstrate Walker's own tastes from the figurative to the abstract and consider what motivates collectors like Walker to surround themselves with art.

 With the support of the Dorset Foundation, the exhibition will travel to four venues from April 2020 until May 2021.

Tour Schedule:
British Museum, 14 January – 5 March 2020
F. E. McWilliam Gallery and Studio, Northern Ireland, 17 October 2020 – 30 January 2021
National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, Opening date TBA – 7 June 2021
Danum Gallery, Library and Museum, Doncaster, 24 July – 1 October 2021
Winchester Discovery Centre, 19 November 2021 – 9 February 2022

British Museum


Bridget Riley

Messengers (wall painting)
The National Gallery, London
From 17 January 2019

Bridget Riley with Messengers by Bridget Riley, Annenberg Court, The National Gallery © 2019 Bridget Riley. All rights reserved / Photo: The National Gallery, London
Bridget Riley with Messengers by Bridget Riley, Annenberg Court, The National Gallery © 2019 Bridget Riley. All rights reserved / Photo: The National Gallery, London

See Messengers, a new large-scale wall painting by Bridget Riley: one of the most important artists of her generation.

The title, Messengers, is inspired by a phrase Constable used when referring to clouds, and might also be an allusion to the numerous angels, bearers of news, that we see in the skies of so many National Gallery pictures.

Painted directly onto the wall of the Annenberg Court and spanning a vast 10 x 20 metres, the abstract work, comprised of coloured discs, carries influences from our historic collection over into the 21st century. Throughout art history, harmonies of colour have played a large part in pictorial composition.Taking as a point of departure the paintings of George Seurat, in particular Bathers at Asnières, Bridget Riley’s 'Messengers' transforms the Annenberg Court into a great white space in which coloured discs float as clouds drift in the lanes of the sky. By leaving after-images on the viewer's retina that suggest volume and movement the longer it is perceived, the work becomes a tribute to its artistic predecessors and to the process of looking at art itself.

Bridget Riley (born 1931) has a long-standing relationship with the Gallery; she made copies of paintings in the collection including Jan van Eyck’s Portrait of a Man (Self Portrait?), 1433, as a teenager as part of her portfolio when applying to Goldsmiths College, London, just after the end of the Second World War, and Georges Seurat's Bathers at Asnières while training as an artist.

In 1989 Riley was invited to select that year’s Artist’s Eye exhibition and between 2010 and 2011 the Gallery held her acclaimed exhibition Bridget Riley: Paintings and Related Work.

The National Gallery, London