back

Rebecca Warren et al.

Mirrors and Windows (group show)
Sammlung Philara, Dusseldorf
18 June – 3 October 2021

Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt
Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt

We are experiencing a time of collective learning and unlearning. Representations, (un-)conscious linguistic customs and institutional structures are put to trial and revised, while alternative concepts are formulated for the future. Such a learning process introduces transformations and at the same time demarcates a privileged space that can lead to exclusions. Who has access to knowledge? Whom do we learn from and from which viewing angles? Teachers are identities significantly shaping our views of the world, for in the process of learning, the reflections (Mirrors) affect the perception and the formation of perspectives (Windows).

In 1921, a hundred years ago, the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf was one of the last academies to follow suit, granting female artists the opportunity to pursue an academic education in the arts. On this occasion, the exhibition Mirrors and Windows in the Philara Collection is dedicated to the centenary of the admission of women to the Düsseldorf Kunstakademie. Female students meanwhile constitute more than half of the body of students at art academies in Germany, yet they are not equally represented in terms of numbers and diversity in museums, on the art market and teaching professions.

With the exhibition Mirrors and Windows, the focus is directed towards the women who teach there. By combining works by former and current professors of the fine arts at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, we would like to take the opportunity to draw attention to both the achievements and the still existing inequalities, and thus inspire an overall evaluation of women in the art world. Which positive changes have already been initiated and which hurdles need yet to be cleared?

Rather than reproducing further gender-based territories, the exhibition's formal set up is aimed at creating a multi-voiced space of diverse, brilliant artistic approaches and experiences. The works featured at the Philara Collection bear similarities in how they question their own position and draw boundaries to and reflect on power structures at the time of their creation. This includes practices of negotiating gendered role attributions, addressing the interaction of private and public policies, questioning traditional language conventions and prerogatives of interpretation and implementing strategies of appropriation and exertion of influence. Alongside renowned positions of contemporary art, the exhibition highlights works by women as yet remaining unknown to a larger audience, since they were only marginally registered by the system of their time or their recognition was carried over into the present less prominently.

Sammlung Philara


Additional:

Rebecca Warren et al.

Breaking the Mould: Sculpture by Women since 1945 (group show)
An Arts Council Collection Touring Exhibition

Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren
Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren

This major new touring exhibition challenges the male-dominated narratives of post-war British sculpture by presenting a diverse and significant range of ambitious work by women. Offering a radical recalibration, Breaking the Mould not only celebrates the strengths of sculpture made by women but also seeks to guard against the threat of slipping out of view. Through this deliberately restorative act, the exhibition seeks to inspire future generations, supporting the maxim ‘if she can see it she can be it’.

Breaking the Mould represents the work of over forty-five sculptors including Rebecca Warren.

Tour schedule:
Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 29 May – 5 September 2021 (Open Thursdays to Sundays and bank holidays, 11am - 4pm. Pre-booking essential. Book tickets at ysp.org.uk)
Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside Arts, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 18 September 2021 – 9 January 2022
The Levinsky Gallery, The Arts Institute, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, 26 March – 5 June 2022
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, 2 July – 2 October 2022
The New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall, October 2022 – March 2023

Arts Council Collection


Hans Josephsohn, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel, Rebecca Warren et al.

Albert Oehlen – “big paintings by me with small paintings by others”
MASI, Lugano
5 September 2021 – 20 February 2022

Installation view: MASI, Lugano, 2021
Installation view: MASI, Lugano, 2021

From 5 September 2021 to 20 February 2022, Museo d’arte della Svizzera italiana (MASI) present the exhibition titled Albert Oehlen – “big paintings by me with small paintings by others”. For this project Albert Oehlen is at the same time an artist, a curator and a collector. Iconic works embodying different phases of his painting career will be displayed alongside a selection of more than thirty international artists belonging to his private collection.

It is always very interesting when artists collect art, and this is particularly true in the case of a reserved, elusive and sometimes even cryptic artist like Albert Oehlen. This is the first time that masterpieces by Oehlen are exhibited alongside works from his private art collection in such an extensive form and in a display conceived by the artist himself in partnership with MASI. This project not only offers surprising insights into his work, but also allows visitors to discover, or rediscover, a series of exceptional artists. The core group of works, representing the essence of Oehlen's art, and the extraordinary chance to admire a part of his private collection in a museum, will enable visitors to engage with the depth and breadth of his pictorial exploration. For many years Oehlen has been expanding his collection with works by artists with whom he feels a connection, not in terms of likeness, but because they address ideas – often associated with the concept of painting – that are very relevant to him too. However, while all the works featured in the exhibition reveal inspiration and similarities (in some cases very evidently), we must not forget that the artist rejects all kinds of classification and rational analysis of his oeuvre. Indeed, Oehlen has always actively shunned interpretative methods that seek to define the meaning of form and content, or, more simply, rejects an approach focusing on the wish to understand art in general. Consequently, the exhibition does not aim to suggest comparisons between Oehlen's work and that of other artists or to insert his work in a “genealogy”, but rather to give visitors an exceptional glimpse into his private collection and allow them to engage – perhaps for the first time – with the work of important international artists in an original and exciting narrative that recounts the history of the art of recent decades from Oehlen's personal perspective. Works by Hans Josephsohn, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel and Rebecca Warren are included.

MASI Lugano


Rebecca Warren

Belvedere 21, Vienna (solo show)
1 July – 16 October 2022

Rebecca Warren,
Rebecca Warren, "The Living", 2005. © Rebecca Warren. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin | London | Paris and Matthew Marks Gallery

The British artist Rebecca Warren makes sculptures, assemblages, and constructions in a wide variety of materials including clay, bronze, steel, and neon. Warren came to prominence in the early 1990s with her large, raw clay sculptures of extravagantly proportioned female forms. Since then her distinctive and complex oeuvre, blending tradition with the quotidian, seriousness with frivolity, mastery with mismatch, has embodied her attitudes to art and its history. With a preference for ambiguity of form and meaning she has said of her work that "it comes from a strange nowhere, then gradually something comes out into the light. There are impulses, half-seen shapes, things that might have stuck with you from decades ago, as well as more recently. It's all stuff in the world going through you as a filter..." Rebecca Warren’s first solo exhibition in an Austrian museum will consist of older works alongside new works made especially for Belvedere 21.

The exhibition is curated by Axel Köhne.

Belvedere 21


Rebecca Warren

Honoured with OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire)

Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet
Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet

We congratulate Rebecca Warren on being awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in Queen Elizabeth II's 2020 Birthday Honours List for services to Art. The title OBE is awarded to individuals who have made great contributions to the United Kingdom.

Rebecca Warren's Aurelius, 2017–2019 is currently on view at Regent's Park in London, as part of Frieze Sculpture, until 18 October 2020.