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Hans Josephsohn, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel, Rebecca Warren et al.

Albert Oehlen – “big paintings by me with small paintings by others”
MASI, Lugano
5 September 2021 – 20 February 2022

Installation view: MASI, Lugano, 2021
Installation view: MASI, Lugano, 2021

From 5 September 2021 to 20 February 2022, Museo d’arte della Svizzera italiana (MASI) present the exhibition titled Albert Oehlen – “big paintings by me with small paintings by others”. For this project Albert Oehlen is at the same time an artist, a curator and a collector. Iconic works embodying different phases of his painting career will be displayed alongside a selection of more than thirty international artists belonging to his private collection.

It is always very interesting when artists collect art, and this is particularly true in the case of a reserved, elusive and sometimes even cryptic artist like Albert Oehlen. This is the first time that masterpieces by Oehlen are exhibited alongside works from his private art collection in such an extensive form and in a display conceived by the artist himself in partnership with MASI. This project not only offers surprising insights into his work, but also allows visitors to discover, or rediscover, a series of exceptional artists. The core group of works, representing the essence of Oehlen's art, and the extraordinary chance to admire a part of his private collection in a museum, will enable visitors to engage with the depth and breadth of his pictorial exploration. For many years Oehlen has been expanding his collection with works by artists with whom he feels a connection, not in terms of likeness, but because they address ideas – often associated with the concept of painting – that are very relevant to him too. However, while all the works featured in the exhibition reveal inspiration and similarities (in some cases very evidently), we must not forget that the artist rejects all kinds of classification and rational analysis of his oeuvre. Indeed, Oehlen has always actively shunned interpretative methods that seek to define the meaning of form and content, or, more simply, rejects an approach focusing on the wish to understand art in general. Consequently, the exhibition does not aim to suggest comparisons between Oehlen's work and that of other artists or to insert his work in a “genealogy”, but rather to give visitors an exceptional glimpse into his private collection and allow them to engage – perhaps for the first time – with the work of important international artists in an original and exciting narrative that recounts the history of the art of recent decades from Oehlen's personal perspective. Works by Hans Josephsohn, Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel and Rebecca Warren are included.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by Mousse Publishing with an introduction by MASI's Director Tobia Bezzola and scientific contributions by Francesca Benini and Christian Dominguez. The catalogue is available via the institution's website.

MASI Lugano


Additional:

Julian Schnabel

Self Portraits of Others (solo show)
The Brant Foundation, New York
9 September – 31 December 2021

Image: Julian Schnabel, Number 5 (Van Gogh Self-Portrait Musee d'Orsay, Vincent), 2019, © Julian Schnabel
Image: Julian Schnabel, Number 5 (Van Gogh Self-Portrait Musee d'Orsay, Vincent), 2019, © Julian Schnabel

The Brant Foundation is pleased to present Self Portraits of Others, a solo exhibition of new works by Julian Schnabel. Created between 2018 – 2020, this series explores the evolution of Schnabel’s artistic practice while making At Eternity’s Gate, a film about the life of Vincent van Gogh. The exhibition features twenty-five plate paintings that examine the theme of portraiture throughout art history.

The Brant Foundation



Hans Josephsohn

Untitled, 1990
on view at the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin as part of the collection display

Installation view: Hans Josephsohn, Untitled, 1990, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2021, © Kesselhaus Josephsohn, St. Gallen, © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie
Installation view: Hans Josephsohn, Untitled, 1990, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2021, © Kesselhaus Josephsohn, St. Gallen, © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie

Hans Josephsohn's half-figure sculpture from 1990 is on permanent display at the recently reopened Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin.

Neue Nationalgalerie


Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen x Sven-Åke Johansson: Rhythm Ace & Slingerland

Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin is pleased to announce Rhythm Ace & Slingerland, which was recorded during a concert conceived by Albert Oehlen with percussionist Sven-Åke Johansson at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg in May 2019.

This new album, a co-production by NI VU NI CONNU and Galerie Max Hetzler, with liner notes by Max Dax is one of numerous collaborations between longstanding friends Oehlen and Johansson, following from their 2003 album Shotgun Wedding, also featuring Mayo Thompson of Red Krayola. This album explores how art infuences music and vice versa – a question often explored in Oehlen’s work.

The idea originated from Johansson’s visit to the artist’s studio in 2018. Oehlen showed the drummer his collection of rhythm machines, American and Japanese, from the 1960s onwards. Oehlen explains “I collect old drum machines because I fnd the contradiction fascinating that you collect devices that can do as little as possible. A drum machine is more attractive to me the more limited it is.”

Johansson responds to Oehlen’s musings and collection by creating the performance for Rhythm Ace & Slingerland. Johansson says of the performance “the situation was an extension of my being and also that of this device. It is a win for both: man and machine. So the experiment was successful.”

This record is available on our publications website.


Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel – The Collector's Edition (publication)

The Collector's Edition of Julian Schnabel's monograph by Taschen is now available. Made in close collaboration with the artist, this oversized limited-edition book is the first to feature his work across all media. Each copy is numbered and signed by the artist.

Get your copy here.

Taschen


Rebecca Warren et al.

Breaking the Mould: Sculpture by Women since 1945 (group show)
An Arts Council Collection Touring Exhibition

Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren
Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren

This major new touring exhibition challenges the male-dominated narratives of post-war British sculpture by presenting a diverse and significant range of ambitious work by women. Offering a radical recalibration, Breaking the Mould not only celebrates the strengths of sculpture made by women but also seeks to guard against the threat of slipping out of view. Through this deliberately restorative act, the exhibition seeks to inspire future generations, supporting the maxim ‘if she can see it she can be it’.

Breaking the Mould represents the work of over forty-five sculptors including Rebecca Warren.

Tour schedule:
Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 29 May – 5 September 2021 (Open Thursdays to Sundays and bank holidays, 11am - 4pm. Pre-booking essential. Book tickets at ysp.org.uk)
Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside Arts, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 18 September 2021 – 9 January 2022
The Levinsky Gallery, The Arts Institute, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, 26 March – 5 June 2022
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, 2 July – 2 October 2022
The New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall, October 2022 – March 2023

Arts Council Collection


Hans Josephsohn et al.

Swiss Sculpture since 1945 (group show)
Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau
12 June – 26 September 2021

Installation view: Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, 2021
Installation view: Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau, 2021

Bronze figures by Alberto Giacometti, kinetic constructions by Jean Tinguely, video objects by Pipilotti Rist – the sculptural work of the past 76 years in Switzerland has been incredibly diverse. The themes, materials and techniques change over the decades, even redefining what sculpture means.

This comprehensive exhibition inside and outside the Kunsthaus offers the public their first overview of an exciting chapter in Swiss art history. It shows 230 works by 150 artists from all linguistic regions of the country, including famous names such as Hans Arp, Germaine Richier, Max Bill and Meret Oppenheim, through to Fischli/Weiss, Roman Signer, Sylvie Fleury and Ugo Rondinone. The younger generations are represented as well, by artists such as Mai-Thu Perret, Claudia Comte and Latifa Echakhch, who was selected for the Swiss Pavilion at the 2022 Venice Biennale. The exhibition contains much that is familiar, but also creates the possibility of new discoveries and re-discoveries. Works by Hans Josephsohn are included.

Aargauer Kunsthaus


Julian Schnabel

on Vincent van Gogh's self-portrait
Museé d'Orsay, Paris

Julian Schnabel was invited by Musée d'Orsay to share his insights on Vincent van Gogh's self-portrait, dating 1889, which is currently on view at the museum as part of its permanent collection.

Watch the video here.


Rebecca Warren et al.

Mirrors and Windows (group show)
Sammlung Philara, Dusseldorf
18 June – 3 October 2021

Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt
Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt

We are experiencing a time of collective learning and unlearning. Representations, (un-)conscious linguistic customs and institutional structures are put to trial and revised, while alternative concepts are formulated for the future. Such a learning process introduces transformations and at the same time demarcates a privileged space that can lead to exclusions. Who has access to knowledge? Whom do we learn from and from which viewing angles? Teachers are identities significantly shaping our views of the world, for in the process of learning, the reflections (Mirrors) affect the perception and the formation of perspectives (Windows).

In 1921, a hundred years ago, the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf was one of the last academies to follow suit, granting female artists the opportunity to pursue an academic education in the arts. On this occasion, the exhibition Mirrors and Windows in the Philara Collection is dedicated to the centenary of the admission of women to the Düsseldorf Kunstakademie. Female students meanwhile constitute more than half of the body of students at art academies in Germany, yet they are not equally represented in terms of numbers and diversity in museums, on the art market and teaching professions.

With the exhibition Mirrors and Windows, the focus is directed towards the women who teach there. By combining works by former and current professors of the fine arts at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, we would like to take the opportunity to draw attention to both the achievements and the still existing inequalities, and thus inspire an overall evaluation of women in the art world. Which positive changes have already been initiated and which hurdles need yet to be cleared?

Rather than reproducing further gender-based territories, the exhibition's formal set up is aimed at creating a multi-voiced space of diverse, brilliant artistic approaches and experiences. The works featured at the Philara Collection bear similarities in how they question their own position and draw boundaries to and reflect on power structures at the time of their creation. This includes practices of negotiating gendered role attributions, addressing the interaction of private and public policies, questioning traditional language conventions and prerogatives of interpretation and implementing strategies of appropriation and exertion of influence. Alongside renowned positions of contemporary art, the exhibition highlights works by women as yet remaining unknown to a larger audience, since they were only marginally registered by the system of their time or their recognition was carried over into the present less prominently.

Sammlung Philara


Rebecca Warren

Belvedere 21, Vienna (solo show)
1 July – 16 October 2022

Rebecca Warren,
Rebecca Warren, "The Living", 2005. © Rebecca Warren. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin | London | Paris and Matthew Marks Gallery

The British artist Rebecca Warren makes sculptures, assemblages, and constructions in a wide variety of materials including clay, bronze, steel, and neon. Warren came to prominence in the early 1990s with her large, raw clay sculptures of extravagantly proportioned female forms. Since then her distinctive and complex oeuvre, blending tradition with the quotidian, seriousness with frivolity, mastery with mismatch, has embodied her attitudes to art and its history. With a preference for ambiguity of form and meaning she has said of her work that "it comes from a strange nowhere, then gradually something comes out into the light. There are impulses, half-seen shapes, things that might have stuck with you from decades ago, as well as more recently. It's all stuff in the world going through you as a filter..." Rebecca Warren’s first solo exhibition in an Austrian museum will consist of older works alongside new works made especially for Belvedere 21.

The exhibition is curated by Axel Köhne.

Belvedere 21


Albert Oehlen

Collaboration with "Talk About Lebanon"

Image © Albert Oehlen
Image © Albert Oehlen

Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to team up with "Talk About Lebanon" in the wake of the fatal explosion in Beirut on 4 August 2020. The first in a series of collaborations is a T-shirt featuring a painting by Albert Oehlen from his iconic "Baumbilder" (Tree Paintings) series. All proceeds from the sale will go towards the NGO "Live Love Beirut" whose mission is to provide assistance to those who cannot afford to repair their homes after the explosion.

The T-shirt can be purchased at Talkaboutlebanon.co.uk

Talk about Lebanon


Rebecca Warren

Honoured with OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire)

Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet
Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet

We congratulate Rebecca Warren on being awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in Queen Elizabeth II's 2020 Birthday Honours List for services to Art. The title OBE is awarded to individuals who have made great contributions to the United Kingdom.

Rebecca Warren's Aurelius, 2017–2019 is currently on view at Regent's Park in London, as part of Frieze Sculpture, until 18 October 2020.


Albert Oehlen et al.

Writing the History of the Future (The ZKM Collection) (group show)
ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe
23 February 2019 – 9 January 2022

Das 30jährige Bestehen des ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe ist der Anlass, mit seiner Sammlung, die als eine der wichtigsten Medienkunstsammlungen der Welt gilt, die Geschichte der Kunst im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert neu zu erzählen. Mit über 500 Objekten zeigt die Ausstellung erstmals die Vielfalt der Künste im medialen Wandel. Sie umfasst Fotografie, Grafik, Malerei und Skulptur ebenso wie computerbasierte Werke, Film, Holografie, Kinetische Kunst, Op-Art, Sound Art, visuelle Poesie und Videokunst.

Das 20. Jahrhundert erlebte eine radikale Transformation des Bildes durch die apparativen Medien. Beginnend mit dem Skandal der Fotografie, der darin bestand, dass Bilder sich quasi selbst herstellen, haben die Medien den „Gesamtcharakter der Kunst verändert“ (Walter Benjamin). Fotografie, Film, Fernsehen, Video, Computer und Internet haben das Verhältnis von Künstler, Werk und Betrachter sowie unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen neu bestimmt. Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht beispielhaft den Wandel der Kunst angesichts der sich verändernden apparativen Produktions-, Rezeptions- und Distributionstechnologien deutlich. Sie zeigt auch, wie KünstlerInnen mediale und soziale Praktiken vorwegnehmen, die erst Jahre später für die gesamte Gesellschaft selbstverständlich werden. Sie schreiben, wie der Titel der Ausstellung sagt, die Geschichte der Zukunft.

Durch die alle Gattungen und Medien übergreifende Perspektive eröffnet die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future auf über 6.000 qm einen neuen Blick auf die Kunst des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts. Diese Epoche rasanten technologischen Wandels durch elektronische und digitale Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien leitete eine nie gekannte Demokratisierung von Kunst und Kultur ein. Writing the History of the Future macht nachvollziehbar, wie das Versprechen der Fotografie, die Abbildung der Welt zu individualisieren, in den 1960er-Jahren von den AktivistInnen der Videokunst nochmals eingelöst wurde. Mit der plötzlich verfügbaren Videotechnik bildeten sie Welten ab, die weder im Fernsehen noch von der Filmindustrie gezeigt wurden und entwickelten eine Ästhetik, die noch heute unsere visuelle Kultur beeinflusst. Die Erweiterung der technischen Trägermedien des Bildes, vom Tafelbild zum Bildschirm, hat die Kunst in einer neuen visuellen Kultur aufgelöst, Massenkultur und Hochkultur verschränkt. Mit der Verbreitung der Computertechnik in den 1950er-Jahren wandelte sich unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen, begann die Automatisierung und Algorithmisierung der Künste. Der zeichenverarbeitende Apparat provozierte Diskussionen wie sie heute im Hinblick auf die Künstliche Intelligenz aufs Neue geführt werden. Elektronische Medien veränderten auch die Wahrnehmung und die Erzeugung des Klangs im 20. Jahrhunderts. Bisher illegitime Klänge und Geräusche wurden zu einem Medium der bildenden Kunst, zur Sound Art.

Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht deutlich, wie grundlegend Apparate das Verhältnis zum Kunstwerk verändert haben – sowohl im Hinblick auf die Produktion als auch auf die Rezeption. Die Erzeugung von Kunst konzentriert sich nicht mehr allein auf das Subjekt des Künstlers bzw. der Künstlerin, sondern inkludiert diverse Aktanten, seien es Apparate oder Menschen. Durch die Entwicklung der partizipativen, interaktiven und performativen Künste, von bewegten Bildern zu den bewegten BetrachterInnen, entstehen seit den 1960er- Jahren offene Werke, welche die BesucherInnen einer Ausstellung nicht allein zum Betrachten, sondern zum Handeln auffordern.

Die Sammlungspräsentation, für die aus 9.500 Werken ausgewählt wurde, zeichnet sich durch ihre gattungsüberschreitende Inszenierung aus. Sie zeigt den Wandel der Gattung Porträt, der Darstellung des Körpers, des Landschaftsbildes und der Architektur vom Gemälde zur interaktiven Computerinstallation. Sie zeigt die Aktualisierung des Urmediums Schrift sowie der Kunst als Format des kollektiven und individuellen Gedächtnisses unter den Bedingungen der Informationstechnologie. Die Ausstellung präsentiert somit eine Kunst radikaler Zeitgenossenschaft, d.h. eine Kunst, in der KünstlerInnen die Gegenwart mit den technischen Medien ihrer Zeit reflektieren. Sie bietet eine einmalige Gelegenheit, mit zum Teil raumgreifenden Installationen und zahlreichen Inkunablen der Medienkunst, einen umfassenden Überblick über die eigentliche Entwicklung der Kunst im 20. Jahrhundert jenseits von Malerei und Skulptur zu gewinnen.

Writing the History of the Future ist nicht allein eine Sammlung von Objekten, sondern auch eine Versammlung von Subjekten. Lounges laden ein, sich zusammenzusetzen und über das Gesehene mit Freunden und Familie auszutauschen, im Ackerspace treffen sich Interessierte zu Workshops und Seminaren. Im BÄM-Lab, dem Maker-Space des ZKM wird gemeinsam experimentiert.

Die Ausstellung ist ein Erlebnis- und Denkraum, in dem das Publikum angeregt wird, an der Geschichte der Zukunft mitzuschreiben.

ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe