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Liz Larner, Navid Nuur, Edmund de Waal, Rebecca Warren et al.

The Flames: The Age of Ceramics (group show)
Musée d'Art Moderne de Paris, Paris
15 October 2021 – 6 February 2022

Image: Liz Larner, vii (subduction), 2015, photo: Charles Duprat
Image: Liz Larner, vii (subduction), 2015, photo: Charles Duprat

Gathering over 350 pieces dating from the Neolithic to the present day, the exhibition The Flames: The Age of Ceramics is an immersive exploration of the medium, a fresh, fruitful dialogue between objects from different periods and contexts that brings to light influences as well as coincidences.

An inexhaustible source of inspiration and expression for craftsmen, artists and designers, ceramics – from the Greek keramos, meaning "clay" – is one of humanity's earliest cultural manifestations, used since prehistoric times to make idols, constructions and food containers.

The exhibition's transhistorical approach focuses on ceramics as inherently related to art and, more broadly, to humankind. Long underestimated among the arts, the medium can be both functional and sculptural, and as such compels us to rethink existing categories and traditional hierarchies. In its mingling of art, craft and design, The Flames explores not only ceramics' relationship to the decorative, the culinary and the performative, but also its scope of application in the fields of medicine, aeronautics and ecology. Works by Liz Larner, Navid Nuur, Edmund de Waal and Rebecca Warren are included.

MAM


Additional:

Edmund de Waal

Letters to Camondo (solo show)
Musée Nissim de Camondo, Paris
7 October 2021 – 15 May 2022

Image: Edmund de Waal, Letters à Camondo, I, 2021, © Edmund de Waal, courtesy of the artist, photo: Alzbeta Jaresova
Image: Edmund de Waal, Letters à Camondo, I, 2021, © Edmund de Waal, courtesy of the artist, photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal will present a major new exhibition this autumn at the spectacular Musée Nissim de Camondo, Paris, inspired by his acclaimed book Letters to Camondo. The exhibition, which runs from 7 October 2021 – 15 May 2022, marks Edmund de Waal’s first solo exhibition in France and the first time a contemporary artist has been invited to create an exhibition for the museum.

In Letters to Camondo, Edmund de Waal traces the story of the Jewish Camondo family, who made their home in Paris in the 1870s and became fixtures of Belle Époque high society, as well as targets of antisemitism, much like de Waal’s relations, the Ephrussi family to whom they were connected. Moïse de Camondo created a remarkable house on the rue de Monceau, on the edge of Parc Monceau, and filled it with a remarkable private collection of French 18th century art for his son Nissim to inherit. When Nissim was killed in the First World War the house became a memorial, with instructions that nothing be changed. In 1936 the mansion became the Musée Nissim de Camondo and its management was entrusted to Les Arts Décoratifs.

Edmund de Waal has been given unique access to the historic surrounds of the Musée Nissim de Camondo, creating an exhibition of new sculptures reflecting on the Camondo family, their story, and their memory. The works will be installed throughout the museum’s exquisite rooms and courtyard, in close dialogue with its collection of 18th century art, furniture and objects assembled by Moïse de Camondo.

Edmund de Waal said: “In the courtyard, I have made a series of eight stone sculptures from golden Hornton stone. The stone has seams of darkness. They are monumental blocks worn into smoothness made to sit on singly, or with others. Each has a very small piece of hammered lead and gold on its edge: they are markers of loss and repair. It is a form of kintsugi – the art of visible repair of an object with a line of gold and lacquer. In the hall stands a long table on which I have written and rewritten one of my letters to Moïse de Camondo through layers of porcelain into gold, a kind of palimpsest. And then in the house, there are several installations of objects – broken shards, vessels, words written into paper – thin slithers of porcelain. They are held in oak vitrines to sit on particular pieces of furniture, frame views and sightlines.”

Musée Nissim de Camondo


Navid Nuur

a large-scale painting commission, now on view, in the new temporary location of the Senate of the Dutch Parliament (Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal)

Installation view: Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal, The Hague, 2021, photo: Mike Bink, courtesy of the artist
Installation view: Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal, The Hague, 2021, photo: Mike Bink, courtesy of the artist

A large-scale painting by Navid Nuur was commissioned by the Dutch Parliament (Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal) and is now on view at its temporary location in The Hague.

The Senate


Rebecca Warren et al.

Mirrors and Windows (group show)
Sammlung Philara, Dusseldorf
18 June – 3 October 2021

Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt
Installation view: Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, 2021, photo: Kai Werner Schmidt

We are experiencing a time of collective learning and unlearning. Representations, (un-)conscious linguistic customs and institutional structures are put to trial and revised, while alternative concepts are formulated for the future. Such a learning process introduces transformations and at the same time demarcates a privileged space that can lead to exclusions. Who has access to knowledge? Whom do we learn from and from which viewing angles? Teachers are identities significantly shaping our views of the world, for in the process of learning, the reflections (Mirrors) affect the perception and the formation of perspectives (Windows).

In 1921, a hundred years ago, the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf was one of the last academies to follow suit, granting female artists the opportunity to pursue an academic education in the arts. On this occasion, the exhibition Mirrors and Windows in the Philara Collection is dedicated to the centenary of the admission of women to the Düsseldorf Kunstakademie. Female students meanwhile constitute more than half of the body of students at art academies in Germany, yet they are not equally represented in terms of numbers and diversity in museums, on the art market and teaching professions.

With the exhibition Mirrors and Windows, the focus is directed towards the women who teach there. By combining works by former and current professors of the fine arts at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, we would like to take the opportunity to draw attention to both the achievements and the still existing inequalities, and thus inspire an overall evaluation of women in the art world. Which positive changes have already been initiated and which hurdles need yet to be cleared?

Rather than reproducing further gender-based territories, the exhibition's formal set up is aimed at creating a multi-voiced space of diverse, brilliant artistic approaches and experiences. The works featured at the Philara Collection bear similarities in how they question their own position and draw boundaries to and reflect on power structures at the time of their creation. This includes practices of negotiating gendered role attributions, addressing the interaction of private and public policies, questioning traditional language conventions and prerogatives of interpretation and implementing strategies of appropriation and exertion of influence. Alongside renowned positions of contemporary art, the exhibition highlights works by women as yet remaining unknown to a larger audience, since they were only marginally registered by the system of their time or their recognition was carried over into the present less prominently.

Sammlung Philara


Liz Larner et al.

New Time: Contemporary Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, University of California, Berkeley
25 August 2021 – 30 January 2022

Installation view: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, University of California, Berkeley, 2021, photo: Impart Photography
Installation view: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, University of California, Berkeley, 2021, photo: Impart Photography

New Time: Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century is a major survey exploring recent feminist practices in contemporary art. In 1980 Lucy Lippard argued that feminist art is “neither a style nor a movement” but rather “a value system, a revolutionary strategy, a way of life.” Taking Lippard’s statement as a point of departure, the exhibition examines the values, strategies, and ways of life reflected in current feminist art. In keeping with Griselda Pollock’s observation that “feminism is a historical project and thus is itself constantly shaped and remodelled in relation to the living process of women’s struggles,” New Time aims to demonstrate that feminism in the twenty-first century is multifaceted, encompassing many complex issues and perspectives, and therefore cannot be reduced to a single subject, style, or agenda. Although artworks made since 2000 are the primary focus, the objects and installations on view span several generations, mediums, geographies, and political sensibilities. In this way the project seeks to convey the heterogeneous, intergenerational, and gender-fluid nature of feminist practices today.

Inspired by Bay Area poet Leslie Scalapino’s feminist poem of the same name, New Time presents a kaleidoscopic view of feminist artistic practices, thought, and experiences. Featuring more than 150 works by seventy-seven artists and collectives, the exhibition is organized around eight themes: hysteria; the gaze; revisiting historical subjects through a feminist lens; the fragmented female body; gender fluidity; labor, domesticity, and activism; female anger; and feminist utopias. Beyond the galleries, the exhibition unfolds in multiple spaces throughout the museum, including the Art Wall, Theater 2, and the large outdoor screen. Work by Liz Larner is included.

Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive


Edmund de Waal

Edmund de Waal in conversation with Lisa Zeitz

Edmund de Waal, photo: Ben McKee
Edmund de Waal, photo: Ben McKee

For the eleventh episode of the podcast series WELTKUNST – Was macht die Kunst?, Edmund de Waal is in conversation with art historian and journalist Lisa Zeitz, to talk about his highly celebrated book The Hare With Amber Eyes. Listen to this episode here.


Navid Nuur et al.

Into Nature – New Energy (group show)
Various venues, Bargerveen/Emmen
31 July – 24 October 2021

Installation view: Navid Nuur, Contact | 52.6769, 699725 | 425.000 v. Chr.–2021, Bargerveen, 2021, photo: Heleen Haijtema
Installation view: Navid Nuur, Contact | 52.6769, 699725 | 425.000 v. Chr.–2021, Bargerveen, 2021, photo: Heleen Haijtema

Navid Nuur's work Contact | 52.6769, 699725 | 425.000 v. Chr.–2021 is included in the 2021 edition of Into Nature, on view in Bargerveen until 24 October. Into Nature is a biennial art expedition through the landscape of Drenthe, showcasing artworks by internationally renowned artists. After the first edition in 2016, Into Nature ventured to various locations in Frederiksoord and on the Holtingerveld in 2018.

At the edge of the local wetland, over thousands of years in age, Nuur has figuratively travelled in time by drilling a hole in the ground. Visitors can see and experience time materialised in physical form by drawing water from the hole and drinking it from a bowl created out of the excavated earth. Or in the artist's own words: "A ritual, which is not a ritual, a religion, which is not either, but 'merely' an act stripped down to the bones of an almost spiritual experience, that feels utterly 'real' because of its austerity."

Into Nature


Liz Larner

Don’t put it back like it was (solo show)
SculptureCenter, New York: 20 January – 28 March 2022
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis: 30 April – 4 September 2022

Image: Liz Larner, Copper cube, woven, 1988, photo: def image
Image: Liz Larner, Copper cube, woven, 1988, photo: def image

For the past three decades, Los Angeles–based artist Liz Larner (US, b. 1960) has explored the material and social possibilities of sculpture in innovative and surprising ways. Today she is one of the most influential artists of her generation engaged with the medium. Larner’s use of materials ranges from the traditional—such as bronze, porcelain, glass, or stainless steel—to the unexpected: bacterial cultures, surgical gauze, sand, or leather. The artist selects each medium for its physical or chemical properties as well as for social and historical associations. Taking direction from these materials, she creates works that can be delicate or aggressive, meticulously crafted or unruly and formless.

Liz Larner: Don’t put it back like it was, co-organized by the Walker and SculptureCenter, New York, is the artist’s largest survey since 2001. Presenting some 30 works produced between 1987 and 2020, the exhibition includes many pieces never before shown. Featured works include Larner’s early experiments with petri dishes and destructive machines, installations that respond to architecture, and more recent wall-based works in ceramic.

As a whole, the exhibition underscores the power and intention of Larner’s work to reconsider objects in physical space as not only a matter of architectural proportions but also as a social, gendered, and psychological construction. As her objects assert themselves in the gallery environment, they reflect a history of sculptural practice and an understanding of physical space that has largely been shaped by (or credited to) men. The experience of viewing these works compels an awareness of our own embodied presence and relationship to this space.

The exhibition examines ways in which Larner has investigated both the material potential of sculpture and its relationship to the viewer, bringing forward key themes that have occupied her work: the dynamic between power and instability, the tension between surface and form, and the interconnectedness of objects to our bodies.

Curator: Mary Ceruti, executive director, Walker Art Center. The New York presentation is organized by Kyle Dancewicz, interim director, SculptureCenter.

SculptureCenter
Walker Art Center


Rebecca Warren et al.

Breaking the Mould: Sculpture by Women since 1945 (group show)
An Arts Council Collection Touring Exhibition

Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren
Image: Rebecca Warren, Regine, 2007, © Rebecca Warren

This major new touring exhibition challenges the male-dominated narratives of post-war British sculpture by presenting a diverse and significant range of ambitious work by women. Offering a radical recalibration, Breaking the Mould not only celebrates the strengths of sculpture made by women but also seeks to guard against the threat of slipping out of view. Through this deliberately restorative act, the exhibition seeks to inspire future generations, supporting the maxim ‘if she can see it she can be it’.

Breaking the Mould represents the work of over forty-five sculptors including Rebecca Warren.

Tour schedule:
Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 29 May – 5 September 2021 (Open Thursdays to Sundays and bank holidays, 11am - 4pm. Pre-booking essential. Book tickets at ysp.org.uk)
Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside Arts, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 18 September 2021 – 9 January 2022
The Levinsky Gallery, The Arts Institute, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, 26 March – 5 June 2022
Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, 2 July – 2 October 2022
The New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall, October 2022 – March 2023

Arts Council Collection


Navid Nuur et al.

Trailblazers. 150th Anniversary of the Royal Award for Modern Painting (group show)
Royal Palace Amsterdam
15 July – 3 October 2021

Installation view: Royal Palace Amsterdam, 2021, photo: Benning & Gladkova
Installation view: Royal Palace Amsterdam, 2021, photo: Benning & Gladkova

The incentives prize for young painters instituted by King Willem III, 150 years ago, is now one of the oldest awards for artists in the Netherlands. The Royal Award for Modern Painting invites painters under 35 years of age to submit their work to be judged and recognised. Trailblazers celebrates the bold imagination of participants from the rich history of the Royal Award.

Guest curators Mirjam Westen and Richard Kofi invited seventeen former participants in the Award (1980–2020) to exhibit their work. They are trailblazers, who interrogate, stretch, disrupt and reconstruct the boundaries of painting. Each one approaches form, material, imagination and subject matter in his or her own innovative way. They exemplify the way in which the Award encourages artists to find their own style.

Art sheds light on what has not yet been illuminated. The works have therefore been selected with a view to entering into dialogue with the building: to respond to the architecture, the interior, the history or the present-day function of this important palace. Some of the artists went so far as to create a new work especially for the exhibition. The artworks thus challenge you to see the palace with fresh eyes. Work by Navid Nuur is included.

Royal Palace Amsterdam


Navid Nuur et al.

The House of Losing Control (group show)
17th Vienna Art Week, Nordwestbahnstraße 53, Vienna
12 – 19 November 2021

From the 12th to the 19th of November 2021, Vienna Art Week will once again shine the spotlight on Vienna as a vibrant center of art. The festival, which takes place for the 17th time, gives insights into Viennese art production alongside around 50 program partners and will be offering a varied choice of events to enjoy for the visitors with free access.  “Losing Control” is the theme which can be interpreted in many ways. This year’s motto is an invitation to artistically explore the many facets of physical and psychological loss of control. The theme also suggests that human beings, on most levels, are uncapable of controlling their destiny. In art production, losing control stands for wild ecstasy as well as for deliberately letting go and consequently immersing into a creative flow.

With The House of Losing Control the Vienna Art Week sets another highlight. For the duration of one week, a condemned building complex in the 20th district will mutate into an experimental space for art and a newly defined cultural meeting place. The building at Nordwestbahnstraße 53 will become a lively stage for an open and internationally networked art scene with a focus on young visual art, but also performance, experimental dance and music. In the former apartments and workshop halls, the thematic arc ranges from loss of control to ecstasy to states of complete letting go and introspection. Work by Navid Nuur is included.

Vienna Art Week


Edmund de Waal

Honoured with CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire)

Image: Edmund de Waal, photo: Ben McKee
Image: Edmund de Waal, photo: Ben McKee

We congratulate Edmund de Waal on being appointed a CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) for his outstanding services to the art as a potter and writer.


Liz Larner

Reef, 2019
now part of the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago

Image: Liz Larner, Reef, 2019, ceramic, glaze, stones, minerals, 12.7 x 414 x 229.9 cm, 5 x 163 x 90 1/2 in., Art Institute of Chicago, Claire and Gordon Prussian Fund for Contemporary Art, 2020.61. © Liz Larner
Image: Liz Larner, Reef, 2019, ceramic, glaze, stones, minerals, 12.7 x 414 x 229.9 cm, 5 x 163 x 90 1/2 in., Art Institute of Chicago, Claire and Gordon Prussian Fund for Contemporary Art, 2020.61. © Liz Larner

We are pleased to announce that Liz Larner's sculpture Reef from 2019 is now part of the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. The work is also currently on view at the institution.

Art Institute of Chicago


Edmund de Waal

stone for two hands and water, 2021
Henry Moore Foundation Studio & Gardens
From 31 March 2021

Installation view: Edmund de Waal, stone for two hands and water, 2021, reproduced by permission of Edmund de Waal and New Art Centre, Wiltshire, © Edmund de Waal, courtesy of the artist
Installation view: Edmund de Waal, stone for two hands and water, 2021, reproduced by permission of Edmund de Waal and New Art Centre, Wiltshire, © Edmund de Waal, courtesy of the artist

Edmund de Waal's sculpture stone for two hands and water, 2021 is on view at the Henry Moore Foundation Studio & Gardens from 31 March 2021. The sculpture has been made by the artist as part of the forthcoming exhibition The Living Hands: Edmund de Waal presents Henry Moore at the Henry Moore Foundation. This exhibition is curated by de Waal and is scheduled to open on 19 May 2021.

Henry Moore Foundation Studio & Gardens


Navid Nuur et al.

Creatives on Creativity (publication)

The publication Creatives on Creativity documents interviews with 44 artists and designers, including Navid Nuur, which were conducted by Steve Brouwers, Creative Director at SBS. Focused on the topic of creativity, they talk about childhood, creative processes, inspirations and the artists' most memorable achievements.

Order a copy here.


Rebecca Warren

Belvedere 21, Vienna (solo show)
1 July – 16 October 2022

Rebecca Warren,
Rebecca Warren, "The Living", 2005. © Rebecca Warren. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin | London | Paris and Matthew Marks Gallery

The British artist Rebecca Warren makes sculptures, assemblages, and constructions in a wide variety of materials including clay, bronze, steel, and neon. Warren came to prominence in the early 1990s with her large, raw clay sculptures of extravagantly proportioned female forms. Since then her distinctive and complex oeuvre, blending tradition with the quotidian, seriousness with frivolity, mastery with mismatch, has embodied her attitudes to art and its history. With a preference for ambiguity of form and meaning she has said of her work that "it comes from a strange nowhere, then gradually something comes out into the light. There are impulses, half-seen shapes, things that might have stuck with you from decades ago, as well as more recently. It's all stuff in the world going through you as a filter..." Rebecca Warren’s first solo exhibition in an Austrian museum will consist of older works alongside new works made especially for Belvedere 21.

The exhibition is curated by Axel Köhne.

Belvedere 21


Edmund de Waal

Letters to Camondo (publication)
UK edition published on 22 April 2021

The UK edition of Edmund de Waal's newest book, Letters to Camondo, has been published on 22 April 2021.

Count Moïse de Camondo lived a few doors away from Edmund de Waal's forebears, the Ephrussi, first encountered in his bestselling memoir The Hare with Amber Eyes. Like the Ephrussi, the Camondos were part of belle époque high society. They were also targets of anti-semitism.

Camondo created a spectacular house and filled it with the greatest private collection of French eighteenth-century art for his son to inherit. But when Nissim was killed in the First World War, it became a memorial and, on the Count's death, was bequeathed to France.

The Musée Nissim de Camondo has remained unchanged since 1936. Edmund de Waal has explored the lavish rooms, exquisite objects and detailed archives. In a haunting series of letters, he writes to the Count, and gets to know the boy who journeyed from Constantinople and became a model French citizen, before all that was gained was torn away.

Order a copy here.


Navid Nuur et al.

Hide & Hair. contemporary ceramics acquisitions 2015 – 2021 (group show)
The Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics, Leeuwarden
3 March – 31 October 2021

Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics, Leeuwarden, photo: Ruben van Vliet
Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics, Leeuwarden, photo: Ruben van Vliet

The Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics in Leeuwarden will present an eclectic selection of contemporary acquisitions from 13 February 2021 to 31 October 2021. All the works were acquired over the past six years under the watchful eye of Tanya Rumpff, curator of modern and contemporary ceramics. Hide & Hair: contemporary ceramics acquisitions 2015 - 2021 is a testimony to Rumpff’s love of ceramics. She will be leaving Princessehof in the autumn.

For this group exhibition, Tanya Rumpff selected works by Cristian Andersen, Erik Andriesse, Adriana Baarspul, Claude Champy, Tal R, Navid Nuur, Johannes Nagel, Nicholas Pope, Olivier van Herpt, Oscar Santillan, Shahpour Pouyan, Per B Sundberg, Rachel de Joode and Johnny Rolf. Sundberg’s Wig II is the latest addition to a collection of contemporary acquisitions and donations initiated by Rumpff. ‘What I find so special about these works is the unexpected, the unattainable and the mysterious. A ceramist never knows what will come out of the kiln; they’re never really completely in control. And that is precisely what I find fascinating about ceramics. It has something alchemical, as if a magician is at work’, says Rumpff.

The Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics


Edmund de Waal

library of exile (catalogue)

The British Museum has published a catalogue on Edmund de Waal's work, centring around his "library of exile", currently shown at the museum.

"This beautifully produced book reflects upon the themes raised by de Waal’s thought-provoking work of art. A preface by Booker Prize-nominated author Elif Shakef considers the importance of literature and its capacity to transcend language and borders. The introduction from British Museum Director, Hartwig Fischer, positions the artwork within the wider context of the Museum’s collection, highlighting the dialogue between objects through time, from ancient history to the contemporary. Finally, de Waal concentrates on the work itself, its journey to the British Museum via Venice and Dresden, and its future role in the foundation of the new University of Mosul Library. 'Library of exile' is a contemplative read which celebrates language and the opportunity for dialogues with the displaced."

British Museum


Rebecca Warren

Honoured with OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire)

Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet
Rebecca Warren, Aurelius, 2017–2019, photo: Peter Mallet

We congratulate Rebecca Warren on being awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in Queen Elizabeth II's 2020 Birthday Honours List for services to Art. The title OBE is awarded to individuals who have made great contributions to the United Kingdom.

Rebecca Warren's Aurelius, 2017–2019 is currently on view at Regent's Park in London, as part of Frieze Sculpture, until 18 October 2020.


Edmund de Waal

Edmund de Waal in conversation with Whitechapel Gallery Director Iwona Blazwick (podcast)

Edmund de Waal. Photo: Ben McKee
Edmund de Waal. Photo: Ben McKee

Renowned artist, ceramicist and writer Edmund de Waal joins Whitechapel Gallery Director Iwona Blazwick to discuss the legacy of British artist and potter Bernard Leach. Founder of the Leach Pottery in St. Ives 100 years ago and celebrated in Kai Althoff’s current show, Leach drew on traditional Japanese ceramics to lay the foundations for modern Studio Pottery. Author of a critical account of Leach’s genesis and aesthetic, de Waal discusses his enduring appeal.

Listen to the podcast by clicking here.

Whitechapel Gallery


Liz Larner

below above (solo show)
Kunsthalle Zürich, Zurich
11 June – 21 August 2022

Liz Larner,
Liz Larner, "Hands" (detail), 1993. © Liz Larner, courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles

Over the past thirty years Californian artist Liz Larner has, together with artists such as Phyllida Barlow, Trisha Donnelly, Nicole Eisenman, Vincent Fecteau and Sarah Lucas, played with our idea of sculpture. Larner’s sculpture revolves around presence and absence – communicating bodies, that is. This is enunciated through the complex, delicate web of traditional and unorthodox perspectives she conjures and her in-depth understanding of forms and materials, their qualities and their heritage. An encounter with Larner’s work is always fruitful and transformational; it is not just an encounter with art history, but equally with beauty, repulsion and eros, with the cosmic, the extra-terrestrial and with humour.

Material and its transformation through form are at the centre – and the periphery – of Larner's often contradictory and challenging oeuvre. Yet hers is a formalist art in a modernist sense, schooled by tradition then disrupted by disbelief. It is as close to psychedelia as it is to Minimalism and it regards research, experimentation, concept and control with the same enthusiasm. For this very reason, Larner continually creates works that redefine what sculpture can be. below above, her exhibition at Kunsthalle Zürich, will include works from 1988 to 2020. above a presentation of selected older works introduce the artist’s broad vocabulary, while below consists of an entirely new work spreading over 500 m2. In this work, Beneath and Above the Horizon, Larner experiments with new materials, recycling and possible developments on an apocalyptic scale. It is, the artist writes, ‘an installation of low forms based on the undulating, tessellating forms of seafoam drifts. These plastic froth drifts will be interspersed with glazed ceramic forms based on 2019 OK, a type of asteroid nicknamed by astronomers as City-killers. If this type of asteroid were to collide with the earth, it would be the equivalent of 10 megatons of TNT. 2019 OK was an undetected asteroid that came very close to crashing to Earth on July 25, 2019.’ Beneath and Above the Horizon opens a new chapter in Larner's already very diverse oeuvre and it will do so on several registers: formally, in terms of material, of scale and as a bleak vision of our and our planet’s future.

‘In a general sense, the work is about being in the world. Different pieces engage different aspects of this, doing it at the same time as being in it. You know, I want the literal, the metaphorical and the theatrical. I want others who are in the room with the work to feel that. To know that they’re thinking about it, but also to have it just be happening to them. When I was younger, one of the first things I found so beautiful about art was that when you’re there in front of it, you can just get it. It comes to you, like ESP [extrasensory perception] (laughter). Sometimes it’s SP without the E, but the extra is important too.’ (Liz Larner, interviewed by Jane Dickson in Bomb, July 1, 2006)

Kunsthalle Zürich