clear

Edmund de Waal

– one way or other – (solo show)
Schindler House, Los Angeles
16 September 2018 - 6 January 2019

Edmund de Waal, installation view, Schindler House, Los Angeles, 2018 © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Joshua White
Edmund de Waal, installation view, Schindler House, Los Angeles, 2018 © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Joshua White

Renowned London-based artist and writer Edmund de Waal will make his first architectural intervention in the U.S. with an exhibition at the MAK Center. Titled –one way or other–, de Waal’s exhibition will include new and recent sculptures responding directly to the materials and integrated spaces of the iconic house. The multisensory exhibition is inspired by the artist’s ideas around migration—what it is to leave one place and adopt another—just as the Viennese émigré architect R.M. Schindler did when moving to Los Angeles to create a new home here in the 1920s. The intervention develops de Waal’s long-standing interest in exile, as reflected in the last decade of his practice and especially his book The Hare with Amber Eyes (2010). The exhibition includes a sound piece conceived with the avant-garde composer Simon Fisher Turner: “a layered memory soundscape of Vienna through its Raumplan.” A special recording of radical modernist Austrian composer Anton Webern’s Drei Kleine Stucke (Three Little Pieces), Op.11 by English cellist Matthew Barley, along with Barley’s own Cello Improvisation, has also been commissioned for the exhibition.

The Schindler House is the birthplace of West Coast modernism. It was conceived by Schindler and his wife Pauline as a modular, changeable live-work home and environment for two families. Built of simple industrial materials (concrete slab, glass, and wood), the house became a hub of forward-thinking aesthetics and cultural and political activity that was frequented by architects, dancers, artists and musicians from Frank Lloyd Wright to John Cage. It continues as such to this day, welcoming artists such as de Waal to respond both to its design and rich cultural history.

Edmund de Waal said, “The Schindler House is an idea about beginnings. It stands as an attempt to create a place for both cooperative living and cooperative practice; to reset the conditions in which a modern family could live and experiment. The last decades of traveling to Vienna have made me think of what it might mean to be an émigré and build a house, to question what you bring with you when you start again so definitively.”

Schindler House, Los Angeles


Additional:

Edmund de Waal

Tales of Exile (talk)
Ateneo Veneto, Venice
6 June 2019, 5pm

Edmund de Waal, sukkah, 2019, Jewish Museum, Sukkah Room, Venice. Photo: Fulvio Orsenigo © Edmund de Waal. Courtesy of the artist
Edmund de Waal, sukkah, 2019, Jewish Museum, Sukkah Room, Venice. Photo: Fulvio Orsenigo © Edmund de Waal. Courtesy of the artist

For this event, Edmund de Waal joins Lisa Appignanesi, Laura Forti, Helon Habila, Danielle McLaughlin, Sabine Scholl at the Ateneo Veneto, Venice. The event is part of the psalm cultural programme, a special series of events, curated together with the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, to accompany Edmund de Waal's exhibition psalm.

psalm


Edmund de Waal

Elective Affinities: Edmund de Waal at the Frick Collection (solo show)
The Frick Collection, New York
30 May - 17 November 2019

Edmund de Waal, Elective Affinities, installation view, The Frick Collection, New York, 2019. Photo: Christopher Burke
Edmund de Waal, Elective Affinities, installation view, The Frick Collection, New York, 2019. Photo: Christopher Burke

The Frick Collection presents a temporary installation of sculptures by acclaimed author and ceramist Edmund de Waal. Site-specific works made of porcelain, steel, gold, marble, and glass are displayed in the museum's main galleries alongside works from the permanent collection.

De Waal is known for his installations of porcelain vessels housed in minimal structures, often created in response to collections and archives or the history of a specific place. Past sites have included Waddesdon Manor and the Chatsworth House — this project marks his first such installation in the United States.

The Frick Collection, New York


Edmund de Waal

psalm (solo show)
To coincide with the 58th Venice Biennale
Canton Scuola Synagogue / Ateneo Veneto, Venice
8 May - 29 September 2019

Edmund de Waal, the library of exile, 2019, Ateneo Veneto, Venice © Edmund de Waal. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Fulvio Orsenigo
Edmund de Waal, the library of exile, 2019, Ateneo Veneto, Venice © Edmund de Waal. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Fulvio Orsenigo

Edmund de Waal is creating a major new two-part exhibition to be displayed in the 500-year-old Jewish Ghetto in Venice, coinciding with the opening of the 58th Biennale.

The first part is located in the spaces surrounding the Canton Scuola, the beautiful 16th century synagogue in the Ghetto Nuovo, which is now part of the Jewish Museum.

New installations of porcelain, marble and gold will reflect the literary and musical heritage of this extraordinary place. The intention is to animate spaces that are little known and little understood by visitors to the Biennale and to bring new audiences into the Ghetto.

The second part of the work will be a pavilion based at the Ateneo Veneto, the fifteenth-century building near the Fenice Opera House that has been an historic centre for cultural debate in Venice. Here, de Waal is constructing a small building within the main space that will house 2,000 books by exiled writers, from Ovid to the present day.

Edmund de Waal said: “This is the project I have always dreamed of doing. It is about exile – what it means to have to move to another country, to speak another language. It brings new installations based on the Psalms, the poetry of exile, into some of the most beautiful spaces of the Ghetto, the first time some of these spaces have been used for contemporary art. And my library for the Ateneo – two thousand books within a porcelain-covered pavilion – will be the most significant sculpture of my life. It will be a new library reflecting Venice’s thousand years as a place of translation, a space to sit and read and be.”

Edmund de Waal website

Museo Ebraico, Venice