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Rineke Dijkstra, Navid Nuur, Michael Raedecker

Freedom - The Fifty Key Dutch Artworks Since 1968 (group show)
Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle
19 January - 12 May 2019

An exhibition entitled Freedom – The Fifty Key Dutch Artworks Since 1968 will open at Museum de Fundatie in Zwolle on 19 January 2019. This ambitious and somewhat unconventional project will feature the fifty ‘key artworks’, the leading works produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years. Freedom will be deliberately subjective, intended both as an invitation to debate and as a declaration of love for Dutch art. As such, Freedom will be unmissable for anyone who wants to see all the top art produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years brought together in one show.

Freedom is being curated by art critic and author Hans den Hartog Jager (b. 1968). He has created a number of other exhibitions for Museum de Fundatie: More Light (2010) about the sublime in contemporary art, More Power (2014) about the possibility or impossibility of artists influencing processes in society and Behold the Man (2016), a portrait gallery that presented an overview both of social change and of developments in art over the past hundred years.

In these times of fragmentation, when the meaning of many things that for decades were taken for granted in the Netherlands is being called into question, we want to show the essential power of art: to open up new vistas, to challenge entrenched values, ethical standards and forms, and to reflect and anticipate the spirit of the age. That is why we have opted for ‘freedom’ as the underlying theme. This word has acquired a curious, almost populist political overtone in the Netherlands in recent years. Fifty years ago ‘freedom’ denoted the revolutionary developments that were breaking out of existing patterns, but now it has come to symbolise clinging to ‘authentic Dutch values’. At the same time, it is easy to maintain that a quest for freedom, independence and uniqueness has remained a core value of contemporary art throughout this period.

With the deliberate, almost classic choice of fifty ‘crucial’ works, we hope to highlight the main elements that constantly recur in the current debate. Art should unashamedly show what it can contribute to ideas, what a unique role it can play in society, whether it be a matter of the importance of a tradition (artistic or otherwise), the way in which art represents national identity, or the degree to which it reflects changing relationships in society. However, just as important is the fact that the exhibition will set out to show visitors how much fantastic art has been produced in the Netherlands over the past fifty years, from Jan Dibbets’ Perspective Correction (1968) to Ria van Eyks My Woven Diary (1976-77), from René Daniels’ Aux Déon (1985) to Natasja Kensmil’s Self-portrait with Cross (1999) and from Guido van der Werve’s Number Eight: Everything Is Going To Be Alright (2009) to Melanie Bonajo’s Night Soil #1 (2016). For decades, art in the Netherlands has been strong, vibrant and free – and it is time to put it firmly in the spotlight.

By bringing so many ‘key artworks’ of the past few decades together, we hope to re-energise the debate on the role of art in society. Ultimately, however, we hope above all that Freedom will be a celebration of the power of art, with an exhibition and a book designed to bring pleasure, inform and provoke thought, so important in the world today.

Museum de Fundatie, Zwolle


Additional:

Rineke Dijkstra

Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature (group show)
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
1 March - 26 May 2019

The major exhibition Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the unmistakable influence that Vincent van Gogh had on the work of David Hockney (1937). On view from 1 March to 26 May 2019.
Visitors learn about both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright colours and their experimentation with perspective. Hockney’s monumental Yorkshire landscapes play a central role.
The exhibition Hockney - Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature features some 120 works, including highlights such as the imposing The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire (2011) from the Centre Pompidou collection, Hockney’s intimate sketchbooks and his iPad drawings. Photographer Rineke Dijkstra created a portrait of the artist, who is now 81 years old, especially for this exhibition.

Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam


Rineke Dijkstra

Treasury! Masterpieces from the Hermitage (group show)
Hermitage, Amsterdam
2 February - 25 August 2019

Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, Marianna (The Fairy Doll), 2014 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra

The tenth anniversary of the Hermitage Amsterdam will trigger a year-long celebration in 2019. The initial event will be Treasury!, the first of the two anniversary exhibitions, featuring a cross-section of masterpieces from the entire collection of the St Petersburg State Hermitage. Including big names in art history like Bernini, Da Vinci, Fabre, Matisse, Rembrandt and Velázquez. Also on show are outstanding works of art from cultures dating back to early prehistory (23,000 BC) and from Ancient Egypt, Classical Greece and Rome; as well as antiquities from civilisations as far afield as Siberia, the Middle East and East-Asia. In the main gallery, below a spectacular piece of light art, you will enjoy thrilling combinations of works from widely differing times and places. What, for example, links Maarten van Heemskerck’s sixteenth-century Calvary triptych with an image of the Buddha made in twelfth-century China? To find out, visit Treasury!

Hermitage, Amsterdam


Navid Nuur

THE AFTER GLOW III (solo show)
NDSM-werf, Amsterdam
18 January - 21 April 2019

Navid Nuur, Hitherto, 2003-2019. Photo: Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk. Courtesy of the artist and NDSM-werf, Amsterdam
Navid Nuur, Hitherto, 2003-2019. Photo: Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk. Courtesy of the artist and NDSM-werf, Amsterdam

Navid Nuur (Teheran, 1976) is fascinated by the functioning of human perception. His artworks are therefore an interplay between material, architecture and sensory phenomena. Light and darkness are a recurring element in his works of art.

For Navid Nuur, light is anything but unambiguous. In his series THE AFTER GLOW he considers the unbridled possibilities of light with an almost metaphysical curiosity. THE AFTER GLOW III is his latest work of art, which was created together with the NDSM-werf. The light art project intervenes in four locations with the architecture of the old shipyard and adds a mysterious nocturnal brilliance to this location.

NDSM-werf, Amsterdam


Navid Nuur

RE:Collecting (group show)
Singer Museum, Laren
11 December 2018 - 7 April 2019

Navid Nuur, City Silence, 2013–2018. Courtesy of the artist and Singer Museum, Laren
Navid Nuur, City Silence, 2013–2018. Courtesy of the artist and Singer Museum, Laren

An exhibition that explores untold stories of corporate collections in The Netherlands

RE:Collecting


Navid Nuur

Out of Office. Art in Business (group show)
Singer Museum, Laren
11 December 2018 - 7 April 2019

Navid Nuur, installation view, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, 2017. Photo: def image
Navid Nuur, installation view, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, 2017. Photo: def image

This winter, for the first time, over 150 rarely seen highlights from the art collections of several major Dutch companies will exchange their familiar home on the office wall for a spot in the museum. Out of Office . Art in Business , an exhibition organised by Singer Laren in collaboration with the Netherlands Association of Corporate Art Collections (VBCN), will offer a surprising overview of 75 years of Dutch art from corporate collections. From 11 December to 7 April this exhibition, featuring work by artists like Karel Appel, Marlene Dumas, Armando, Jan Schoonhoven and Folkert de Jong, will reveal some surprising connections between artists from different period and between the different collections.

Out of Office will showcase the multifaceted range of Dutch art from 1945 to the present that is held in corporate collections, tying in with the VBCN’s efforts to bring art treasures from its members’ collections to the general public. The exhibition will be based on a number of themes, grouping artworks from different periods and leading to some surprising artistic encounters. The theme of ‘Liberated’ will bring together Lucebert, Karel Appel and David Bade. Works by Carel Willink, Erwin Olaf and others will enter into a dialogue in the gallery devoted to the theme ‘On the Shoulders of Giants’. ‘Guilty’ will be the element connecting Pyke Koch, Armando and Ronald Ophuis. Portraits by Ina van Zyl, Marlene Dumas, Levi van Veluw, René Daniëls and many others will feature under the title ‘Ecce Homo’. Finally, ‘A New Skin’ will feature spectacular installations by artists like Folkert de Jong and Peter Struycken.

Singer Museum, Laren


Rineke Dijkstra

Picasso, a Period of Conflict (group show)
Carré d'Art, Nîmes
24 October 2018 - 3 March 2019

Rineke Dijkstra, I See a Woman Crying, 2009 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, I See a Woman Crying, 2009 (film still) © Rineke Dijkstra

For the exhibition at the Carré d’Art, the Musée Picasso has consented to an exceptional loan of thirty-seven works. The choice for the Carré d’Art fell upon the creations of Picasso during the agitated political period of the Second World War through to his remarkable 1951 painting, Massacre in Korea. Ever since 1937, with the creation of Guernica, Picasso experienced a period of political commitment during which he lost all hope of seeing a free Spain. These troubled times were reflected in most of the subjects – portraits, still lifes, landscapes – which he treated over the course of these years. Violence is brilliantly portrayed in La Suppliante (1937), as well as in the many portraits of Dora Maar, in which it plays a vital part. It is also present in the Weeping Woman series or Cat Catching a Bird.

The exhibition also attempts to initiate a dialogue between Picasso’s works and those of contemporary artists. There is, on the one hand, in the very heart of the space dedicated to Picasso, the presence of artists who provide perspectives on his work. Also, in parallel, the exhibition Lignes de Fuite (Vanishing Points) presents artists of different backgrounds who are directly concerned by the conflicts in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Carré d'Art, Nîmes


Rineke Dijkstra

Ecstasy (group show)
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart
29 September 2018 - 24 February 2019

Rineke Dijkstra, The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK, 2009, video still, 2009 © Rineke Dijkstra
Rineke Dijkstra, The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK, 2009, video still, 2009 © Rineke Dijkstra

Ecstasy is one of the oldest and one of the most astounding phenomena of European and non-European cultures. Originally forged in the context of religion and ritual, the transcendental experience of ecstasy was first conceptualized in antiquity. It has been an integral part of Western social theories ever since, even as its definition and social significance have been continually modified and expanded. In indigenous cultural spaces, ecstasy generally bears positive connotations and is experienced within the context of ritual acts, but it was and is often perceived as threatening in societies dominated by industrialization, capitalism, and globalization. Here ecstasy means loss of control, and it harbors the danger of an individual or an entire collective deviating from the norm. Exceptions are transcendental experiences within religious contexts or profane ecstasies, as may be observed during sporting events, concerts, or politically motivated activities.
In its cultural significance and complexity, ecstasy also entered the visual arts and engaged in extraordinary alliances with the related disciplines of music and dance.

Beginning in the fall of 2018, the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart will, for the first time, trace these and other connections as it dedicates itself to the phenomenon of ecstasy in a large thematic exhibition. Drawing from paradigmatic examples from antiquity to the present, the exhibition illuminates the various spiritual, political, psychological, social, sexual, and aesthetic implications of euphoric and intoxicated states between asceticism and excess.

In approximately ten thematic rooms, the visitor will become familiar with the various faces of
ecstasy and with the shifting social significance of mind-altering states as it changed over the
centuries. In so doing, it will also consider how different cultural spheres handle the phenomenon of ecstasy. With art at its foundation, the exhibition will introduce the viewer to the various ways that artists have approached ecstatic states—from pictorial representations to video and installation works to kinesthetic experiences. The visitor may therefore not only comprehend but also experience the relevance and historical development of ecstasy. Music plays a central role here, as it unifies transcendental experience in all cultures. Rhythmic sounds, repetitive movements, and visual stimuli prepare the groundwork for reaching a state of »being beside oneself.«

Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart


Rineke Dijkstra

The Moment is Eternity – Works from the Olbricht Collection (group show)
me Collectors Room / Stiftung Ulbricht, Berlin
26 September 2018 - 1 April 2019

From 26.09.2018 to 01.04.2019, with some 300 works by approximately 60 artists on display, The Moment is Eternity shines the spotlight on the photographic works in the Olbricht Collection, showing them in dialogue with other artworks from the collection, as well as artefacts from the Wunderkammer.

Transience is one of the key themes of the Olbricht Collection. And what artistic medium other than photography could be better suited to addressing the questions of time and history that this theme throws up? Lending duration to the moment is inscribed into the very medium itself. In this property, art and philosophy come together. Ever since Antiquity, eternity has been described as timeless, and it is in this sense that Goethe equates the moment with eternity in his poem ‘Vermächtnis’ (Legacy, 1830). For humanity, the moment is the only perceptible slice of eternity.

Goethe’s ‘legacy’ is to shape the world through sensuous and reasoned perception: Jumping ahead through the epochs, this fits together with Henri Cartier-Bresson’s dictum of the ‘decisive moment’ to describe an art that is able to simultaneously capture the essence of an event and the form that corresponds to that essence. Just as the photographic grasp on reality intensifies the signs and symbols of an era, the interplay of other art forms also reflects diverse aspects such as duration and transience. The expansive range of the Olbricht Collection explores such themes as beauty and sensuousness, becoming and disappearing, and the body and society, as manifested in various epochs and media.

me Collectors Room / Stiftung Ulbricht, Berlin


Navid Nuur

True Luxury... Art acquisitions 2012-2018 (group show)
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
22 September 2018 - 3 March 2019

Navid Nuur, Study 50-53 (The Eye Codex of the Monochrome), 1980-2010. Courtesy of the artist and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
Navid Nuur, Study 50-53 (The Eye Codex of the Monochrome), 1980-2010. Courtesy of the artist and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

Films, videos, installations, paintings, sculptures and works on paper are featured, by artists like Bell & Frick, General Idea, Magali Reus, Erik van Lieshout, Arthur Jafa, Tony Oursler, Ed Atkins, Meschac Gaba, Helen Marten, Han Schuil, and Fiona Tan. Almost a third of the selected pieces were gifted by artists, private collectors, and international and Dutch galleries.

With this exhibition, the museum underlines the increasing importance of private donations to the collection. The Stedelijk has traditionally received large numbers of artworks gifted by artists. Many of the purchased pieces were possible thanks to the generosity of funds such as the Rembrandt Association, Mondriaan Fund, BankGiro Loterij, Young Stedelijk and Stedelijk Circle. Some of the works were purchased jointly with fellow institutions in the Netherlands and beyond, a phenomenon that is gaining in popularity, as is the increasing number of collegial loans. The Stedelijk’s new acquisition of Imitation of Life (35 mm film, 2013) by Mathias Poledna, for example, goes on view for the first time in a presentation at the Centraal Museum, Utrecht in September.

The title of the exhibition at the Stedelijk is taken from the installation Echte luxe is niets kopen / True Luxury is Not to Shop by the Dutch artist Erik van Lieshout, who gifted the work to the museum in 2016. It is an ironic reference to the reality that, in a time of shrinking museum budgets and skyrocketing prices on the international art market, collections rely on magnanimous donors to expand their holdings. Although the exhibition spotlights recent acquisitions, several clear thematic threads leap out, such as an engagement with new technology, digital culture and the repercussions of globalization. Among the show’s highpoints is the space-filling installation by Erik van Lieshout, the imposing video installations of Arthur Jafa and the donation of the archive of the former Canadian artist collective General Idea, including their graphic work, mail art, multiples, invitations and publications.

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam