clear

Bridget Riley

Into the Light: Photography and Abstract Art (group show)
Tate Modern, London
3 May - 16 September 2018

How photographers responded and contributed to the invention of abstract art

The birth of abstract art and the invention of photography were both defining moments in modern visual culture, but these two stories are often told separately. Into the Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. Key vintage prints are brought together from pioneers like Paul Strand, László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray, as well as lesser-known experimental works and those of contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff. Their work is shown alongside abstract paintings, sculptures and installations by major figures in abstract art, from Georges Braque and Jackson Pollock to Carl Andre and Bridget Riley.

Tate Modern, London


Additional:

Bridget Riley

On With The Show (group show)
Kunsthalle Nürnberg, Nuremberg
7 December 2017 - 25 February 2018


Bridget Riley

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White (group show)
The National Gallery, London
30 October 2017 – 18 February 2018

With more than 50 works painted on glass, vellum, ceramic, silk, wood, and canvas, Monochrome explores the tradition of painting in black and white over 700 years, from its beginnings in the Middle Ages through the Renaissance and into the 21st century.

Paintings by old masters such as van Eyck, Dürer, Rembrandt, and Ingres appear alongside works by some of the most exciting contemporary artists working today, including Gerhard Richter, Chuck Close, and Bridget Riley.

[...]

With major loans from around the world, and works from the National Gallery Collection, Monochrome is a radical new look at what happens when artists cast aside the colour spectrum and focus on the visual power of black, white, and everything in between.

The National Gallery, London


Bridget Riley

Lubaina Himid: Meticulous Observations and Naming the Money (group show)
Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
7 October 2017 - 18 March 2018

A powerful new exhibition by 2017 Turner Prize nominee Lubaina Himid MBE, Lubaina Himid: Meticulous Observations and Naming the Money features works selected by Lubaina from the Arts Council Collection, along with 20 figures from her major installation, Naming the Money.

The pieces selected by Lubaina are all by women artists, and  occupy one room within the gallery.

Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool


Bridget Riley

Never Ending Stories (group show)
Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg
29 October 2017 - 18 February 2018

Bridget Riley, BLAZE 4, 1964 © Bridget Riley. All rights reserved
Bridget Riley, BLAZE 4, 1964 © Bridget Riley. All rights reserved

In today’s world, the loop seems to be virtually ubiquitous—whether in music, on the internet, in video art, or in hotel lobbies and living rooms, where monitors present the endless crackling of an open fire or fish swim around in aquariums. At the same time, the self-contained circuit, the endless loop, has been an essential topos of cultural history and philosophy since antiquity. With “Never-Ending Stories”, the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg presents, for the first time worldwide, a formally and thematically, as well as spatially and temporally wide-ranging research project dedicated to the interdisciplinary phenomenon of the endless loop in art, film, architecture, music, literature and cultural history.

Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg


Bridget Riley

Going Public - The Kirkland Collection (group show)
Graves Gallery, Museum Sheffield, Sheffield
2 September - 2 December 2017

Bridget Riley, Red Overture, 2012  © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved
Bridget Riley, Red Overture, 2012 © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved

Reflecting a passion for photography, minimalism and geometric abstraction, Jack Kirkland’s personal collection brings together work by some of the most important artists of the past 75 years.

This new exhibition showcases personally selected highlights from the collection, including painting, sculpture, works on paper and photography by Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Josef and Anni Albers, Bridget Riley, Lewis Baltz and more.

Museum Sheffield


Bridget Riley

Konkrete Anliegen. Sammlung Teufel (group show)
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart
4 February 2017 - 7 January 2018


Bridget Riley

To Distribute and Multiply: The Feibes & Schmitt Gift (group show)
The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls
From 10 June 2017

The Hyde Collection celebrates the opening of its first gallery dedicated to Modern and Contemporary art, the Feibes & Schmitt Gallery, with forty works drawn from the collection donated by Werner Feibes and the late James Schmitt in 2016. Architects by profession, the collectors primarily acquired Abstract and non-representational art, reveling in their contemporaries’ new-found freedom from depicting the natural world. The title of the exhibition, To Distribute and Multiply, is inspired by the words of artist and teacher Josef Albers, whose work is represented in the collection. In addition to Albers, the exhibition features a number of works by other major twentieth-century artists including Jean (Hans) Arp, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Louise Nevelson, George Rickey, Bridget Riley, and Andy Warhol.

The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls


Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley (solo show)
The Chinati Foundation, Marfa
6 October 2017 - 2019

Bridget Riley, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 1983, as wall painting, Bolt of Colour, 2017. Courtesy Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas. ©Bridget Riley. All rights reserved. Photo: Alex Marks
Bridget Riley, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 1983, as wall painting, Bolt of Colour, 2017. Courtesy Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas. ©Bridget Riley. All rights reserved. Photo: Alex Marks

In October 2017 the Chinati Foundation will inaugurate a large new multicolored wall painting by Bridget Riley. The artwork has been conceived specifically for the museum’s special exhibition building and will encompass the entire U-shaped enclosure. The work will debut during Chinati Weekend, October 6 through 8, and remain on view through 2019.

For more than fifty years Bridget Riley has pursued a rigorous, open-ended, and self-renewing inquiry into the constituent elements of abstract painting. She established her reputation in the early and mid-1960s with visually dizzying black-and-white works and then, through a slow step-by-step process later that decade, began to explore the properties of color. Throughout her career, Riley has developed paintings through the accumulation and distribution of particular forms—vertical and horizontal stripes, circles, triangles, and rhomboids, curving bands—that move rhythmically across the surface of a painting. The works create luminous visual fields that are difficult to take in all at once and that seem to shimmer, blink, and glow in an indeterminate space between the viewer and the actual surface of the painting. Over the course of her career, Riley’s explorations of the possibilities of a given template of shapes and colors have prompted further investigations, and she often returns to forms she has used earlier in order to test them in new contexts.

Riley’s first wall painting was made in response to a 1979 invitation from the Royal Liverpool Hospital to conceive a work for its walls. Riley devised a visual scheme featuring horizontal ribbons of color, running the lengths of the hospital corridors. The palette, like that of her paintings at the time, was inspired by a 1980 trip to the pyramids and tomb paintings of ancient Egypt. Of this color scheme Riley later wrote: “The Ancient Egyptians had a fixed palette. They used the same colors—turquoise, blue, red, yellow, green, black and white—for over 3,000 years….In each and every usage these colors appeared different but at the same time they united the appearance of the entire culture. Perhaps even more important, the precise shades of these colors had evolved under a brilliant North African light and consequently they seemed to embody the light and even reflect it back from the walls.”

Riley completed the design for the Royal Liverpool Hospital in 1983. In the years since, she has made many more wall paintings, including a work for two floors of St. Mary’s Hospital in London in 1987, with a third floor completed in 2014. In addition to these commissions, Riley has made wall drawings for numerous museum and gallery exhibitions and collections in the U.S., the U.K., and Europe.

Riley’s wall painting for Chinati will be the artist’s largest work to date and span six of the eight walls of the building. As referenced in the work’s title, Wall Painting, Royal Liverpool Hospital 1983–2017, the mural revisits Riley’s Egyptian palette and establishes a continuity between the design for the Royal Liverpool Hospital and the new work for Chinati. It is inspired in part by similarities in size and spatial orientation in the sites of each project and affinities between the brilliant light and palette the artist witnessed in Egypt and the high desert landscape in which the Chinati Foundation is situated.

Riley draws inspiration from nature—not as a subject to be depicted but as a play of perceptions and sensations. She has written: “For me nature is not landscape, but the dynamism of visual forces—an event rather than an appearance. These forces can only be tackled by treating color and form as ultimate identities, freeing them from all descriptive or functional roles.” Riley’s paintings make plain how they were made yet induce optical effects that supersede their physical qualities, demonstrating a rapport with works in Chinati’s permanent collection by artists of her generation such as Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin. Her wall painting for Chinati will merge art and architecture and release the potentiality of color in harmony with many of the works in the museum’s collection.

The Chinati Foundation, Marfa