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Ida Ekblad, Michel Majerus, Richard Prince et al.

Faithless Pictures (group show)
National Museum, Oslo
9 February - 13 May 2018

Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 1989. Photo: Astrup Fearnley Museum
Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 1989. Photo: Astrup Fearnley Museum

The complex relationship between image and reality has long been one of the most important topics in art.

In this exhibition, the National Museum shows works from the last four decades by more than forty prominent artists. Using a variety of approaches, they all address the surfeit of images we see all around us.

The visual deluge that supposedly represents our lives, our times, our world. News clips, holiday snaps, flickers from the depths of the internet. A fragmented intermediate world, half illusion, half reality. Excerpts and selections. And in the midst of it all: glimpses of truth. Images with the power to change the world.

New times, new questions

It is forty years since Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince and the Pictures Generation entered the art scene with their incisive critiques of the clichéd visual culture of television and commercial magazines. A world obsessed with images and illusion.

We are living through a technological revolution. The torrent of images and the balance of power are changing. A smartphone camera in everyone’s pocket. The immediacy and reach of social media. These are new times, and art is posing new questions.

Play, borrow, steal

This exhibition presents iconic, pioneering statements alongside entirely new works. Artists conduct their explorations across a broad front. From film and photo to sculpture and painting. On old newspaper and pages from magazines. From Vibeke Tandberg’s staged images of herself as a young bride and Hito Steyerl’s search for her past as a bondage model, to Alfredo Jaar’s non-photo of Osama Bin Laden’s death and Mike Bouchet’s scintillating porn fragments.

The featured artists address the power of the image over reality and our own self-understanding. They expose the illusion, the manipulation, the masks. They play, borrow, steal. Take control of unclaimed images that define the world. And ask: What truth is possible?


Additional:

Richard Prince

Richard Prince: Untitled (Cowboy) (solo show)
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles
3 December 2017 - 25 March 2018

In two photographic series from the 2010s, publicly exhibited for the first time, Richard Prince (United States, b. 1949) continues his career-long engagement with the motif of the cowboy. Untitled (cowboy), recently acquired by LACMA, and Untitled (original cowboy) achieve the grandeur of 19th-century history painting while also deconstructing the iconography of the American West. Once again challenging the conventional meanings and limits of the photographic medium, Prince reignites debates he sparked some 40 years ago.

In the mid-1970s, Prince was an aspiring painter working in Time Inc.’s tear sheet department, clipping texts for magazine writers. After he removed the articles, he was left with advertisements: glossy pictures of commodities, models, and other objects of desire. Between 1980 and 1992, Prince paid particular attention to the motif of the cowboy, as depicted in a series of advertisements for Marlboro cigarettes. Prince began to re-photograph the advertisements, cropping and enlarging them to make limited-edition prints as artworks of his own. Prince’s re-photography had an explosive effect on the art world, provoking lawsuits and setting auction records. With this controversial practice, he redefined what it means to “take” a photograph.

For his 2015–16 Untitled (cowboy) photographs, Prince revisited copies of TIME from the 1980s and 1990s using contemporary technology. In contrast to this studio-based manipulation, for the 2013 series Untitled (original cowboy) Prince went to Utah, seeking out quintessential viewpoints established by legions of photographers—tourists and artists alike—who preceded him. Extending his interrogation of this particular American protagonist into the era of Instagram, Prince demonstrates that the stakes around originality, appropriation, and truth in advertising are as high as ever.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles


Richard Prince

Proof of Life (group show)
Weserburg I Museum für Moderne Kunst, Bremen
20 May 2017 - 25 February 2018

The construction of the Tower of Babel as a massacre. The artist as a dead revolutionary. A stained-glass window made from butterfly wings. Proof of Life brings together 100 paintings, sculptures and photographic works that investigate existential questions in a both palpable and profound manner. Their aesthetic impact inevitably draws the viewer into its spell. What these works bring to view is linked to a tradition of influential pictures, some of which go far back in time. The presented works simultaneously quote, seduce, irritate, provoke and thematize concepts of moral values. This includes a summons not only to situate in historical terms what is being seen, but also to relate it quite concretely to the present. The works come from a private collection that has never before been publicly presented in this form.

Proof of Life raises the question as to whether and why such images anchored in our memory are still relevant today. The exhibition shows how striking pictorial models are updated in a surprising manner and transformed into new visual inventions. The artistic results are simultaneously fascinating and shocking; the aesthetic experiences they make possible are complex and revelatory. They become documents and symbols of our present era and thus vital signs of contemporary culture.
“The exhibition derives its strength from the impact of the pictures, which in no way excludes deeper insights but instead fosters them. The works don’t immobilize us in wordless veneration but cause astonishment, questioning and doubt which we relate directly to the present. Fundamental questions raised by this exhibition are how art possesses this capability and why certain age-old motifs don’t become petrified manifestations in a museum but instead remain extremely lively.” Peter Friese, Director of the Weserburg

Weserburg I Museum für Moderne Kunst, Bremen


Michel Majerus

Exhibition #3 (group show)
Sammlung Boros, Berlin
2017 - 2022

Im Bunker werden Werkgruppen aus der Privatsammlung Boros gezeigt.

Folgende Künstler sind in der aktuellen Ausstellung Sammlung Boros #3 zu sehen:
Martin Boyce, Andreas Eriksson, Guan Xiao, He Xiangyu, Uwe Henneken, Yngve Holen, Sergej Jensen, Daniel Josefsohn, Friedrich Kunath, Michel Majerus, Fabian Marti, Kris Martin, Justin Matherly, Paulo Nazareth, Peter Piller, Katja Novitskova, Pamela Rosenkranz, Avery Singer, Johannes Wohnseifer.

Sammlung Boros, Berlin


Michel Majerus

Michel Majerus. Laboratorium für die Feststellung des Offensichtlichen (solo show)
Michel Majerus Estate, Berlin
28 April 2017 - 3 March 2018