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Christopher Wool

The Broad, Los Angeles (solo show)
8 February – 31 December 2020

In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day.

An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad) kicks off The Broad's 5th Anniversary Year on February 8. The works on view in this expansive presentation spans from 1985 to 2015, including iconic works that use text, roller paintings, and recent works using digital manipulation, including:
    •    Untitled (1991) – a work that reproduces a quote from Situationist writer Raoul Vaneigem, which Wool found in Lipstick Traces, a book by rock music critic Greil Marcus).

    •    I Smell a Rat (1994) – a pivotal work for the artist, in which he began reusing his own work as an image bank for generating paintings.

    •    Untitled (2015) – a recent painting in which Wool uses digital methods.

The Broad


Additional:

Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Nur nichts anbrennen lassen. New presentation of the collection (group show)
Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn
3 June 2020 – 1 July 2022

installation view: Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, 2020. Photo: David Ertl
installation view: Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, 2020. Photo: David Ertl

After the great survey of painting in the exhibition Jetzt! Young Painting in Germany, the Kunstmuseum Bonn is now turning its attention once again to its own collection, which is being presented in a new way in its many and varied aspects, incorporating acquisitions and donations from recent years as well as permanent loans from private collections (KiCo, Mondstudio, Scharpff-Striebich, etc.).

At the same time, the re-hanging also provides a resonance space for the positions previously shown in Jetzt!, since the Kunstmuseum has defined painting as the focal point of its collection of contemporary art from the very beginning. Thus, a room with paintings from the 1980s provides a retrospective of the emphatic revitalization of painting and at the same time an outlook on current painting projects, for example Tobias Pils and his complex paintings, both reflective and intuitively developed. The spectrum ranges from Informel to Palermo, Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and to Pia Fries, Christopher Wool and Thomas Huber.

Also the pictorial possibilities of photography are discussed, with new acquisitions of photographs by Heidi Specker and Viktoria Binschtok, which were previously shown in solo exhibitions at the Kunstmuseum, and photographs by Claudia Fährenkemper and Hartmut Neumann, who donated a comprehensive body of his work to the museum. The museum also received works by Harald Naegeli, who is not presented here as a sprayer, but with his Urwolken as a creator of utopian drawing spaces.

The video centre is showing the film Unheil (disaster) by John Bock, acquired in 2018, which invents a medieval age full of disturbing rituals. Separate rooms are dedicated to Isa Genzken and Georg Herold, two artists who refuse to be tied down by any kind of media or content, Genzken confidently improvising, Herold with irreverent humour "Nur nichts anbrennen lassen" ("Just don't scorch anything").

Kunstmuseum Bonn


Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel, Christopher Wool et al.

Artist's Choice: Amy Sillman – The Shape of Shape (group show)
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York

Installation view: The Museum of Modern Art(MoMA), New York, 2019. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Heidi Bohnenkamp
Installation view: The Museum of Modern Art(MoMA), New York, 2019. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Heidi Bohnenkamp

The Museum of Modern Art announces Artist’s Choice: Amy Sillman—The Shape of Shape, an exhibition of nearly 75 works from MoMA’s collection selected by Sillman (b. 1955), an artist who has helped redefine contemporary painting, pushing the medium into installations, prints, zines, animation, and architecture. On view from October 21, 2019, through April 12, 2020, the exhibition includes a wide array of works, many rarely seen, installed in a unique shelving display on the fifth floor of The Jerry Speyer and Katherine Farley Building.

In this exhibition, Sillman presents a highly personal exploration of shape—the ever-shifting boundaries that define what and how we see—in modern art. Works spanning vastly different time periods, places, and mediums engage the eccentric forms and unpredictable contours of bodies, fragments, gestures, and shadows. Sillman examines the creation of shape as an act of subjective choice—in contrast to art made by following systems, rules, or grids, conventions that have often dominated artistic practice throughout the 20th century. The Shape of Shape is organized by Amy Sillman with Michelle Kuo, The Marlene Hess Curator, and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Reflecting on her curatorial process, Sillman said, “Even though shape is everywhere, we don’t talk about it much; it’s not a hot topic in art, like color or systems. So I decided to look for works in MoMA’s collection in which shape does prevail over other considerations. I found a wealth of artworks, far too many to include here, by artists who dig into life’s surfaces, who start with physical perception rather than abstract logic. Often eccentric, poetic, or intimate, these works are like bodies that speak, operating at the hub of language and matter, signs and sensations.”

The Shape of Shape includes works by a diverse range of artists, including Albert Oehlen, Julian Schnabel und Christopher Wool, among many others.

MoMA