back

Albert Oehlen

Collaboration with "Talk About Lebanon"

Image © Albert Oehlen
Image © Albert Oehlen

Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to team up with "Talk About Lebanon" in the wake of the fatal explosion in Beirut on 4 August 2020. The first in a series of collaborations is a T-shirt featuring a painting by Albert Oehlen from his iconic "Baumbilder" (Tree Paintings) series. All proceeds from the sale will go towards the NGO "Live Love Beirut" whose mission is to provide assistance to those who cannot afford to repair their homes after the explosion.

The T-shirt can be purchased at Talkaboutlebanon.co.uk

Talk about Lebanon


Additional:

Albert Oehlen, Thomas Struth et al.

The Essl Collection (group show)
Albertina Modern, Vienna
7 December 2020 – 14 March 2021

Installation view: The Essl Collection, Albertina, Vienna, 2020 © Fotoatelier Albertina
Installation view: The Essl Collection, Albertina, Vienna, 2020 © Fotoatelier Albertina

The winter/spring season of 2020/2021 at Albertina Modern is given over to the Essl Collection.

This marks the first time that an overview of the Essl Collection’s historical depth and geographical breadth, ranging from American output to artworks from China, has been presented in Austria’s capital city—with 110 masterpieces created between 1960 and the present by famous artists ranging from Antoni Tàpies to Maria Lassnig, and Georg Baselitz, and from Alex Katz to Fang Lijun, Annette Messager and Nam June Paik.

The selected paintings, sculptures, objects, installations, and videos simultaneously provide an impression of the great diversity of media covered by the Essl Collection, which has been held by the ALBERTINA Museum since 2017 and now forms the backbone of the museum’s modern and contemporary art holdings.

This exhibition places the most influential and important Austrian artists in dialog with pivotal international artistic stances of the present era and their foremost proponents.

Albertina Modern


Hans Josephsohn, Albert Oehlen et al.

CAMBIO. New Additions to the Collection (group show)
Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, St. Gallen
5 December 2020 – 18 April 2021

Installation view: Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2018, Kunstmuseum St. Gallen. Photo: Stefan Rohner
Installation view: Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2018, Kunstmuseum St. Gallen. Photo: Stefan Rohner

Karin Karinna Bühler’s (*1974, Herisau) sculpture CAMBIO, which was created specifically for the Arte Castasegna exhibition project in 2018 and became the leitmotif of the exhibition, was donated to the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen in 2020 by the Lienhard Foundation. The latest presentation of works from the collection at the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen takes its title from this brilliant work. Made of polished chrome steel, the sculpture literally depicts change as well as the fact that the surroundings, including the viewer, are constantly reflected in it. To return the sculpture from Castasegna, the artist attached it to the roof of a delivery truck and drove back to Trogen. She describes the trip as “an odyssey due to the circumstances—the snowfall in the Alps meant I had to travel through Italy.” CAMBIO thus reflected many new landscapes and became the subject of the photo series CAMBIO ON THE ROAD, which is on view at the end of the exhibition.

The board of trustees of the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen decided not to wait for a thematically or chronologically fitting context to present the new acquisitions and donations, and instead to regularly create an exhibition out of the richness of these works. The donated works thus share a common denominator under the title CAMBIO, which forms the context in which they will be exhibited for the first time at the museum over the next five months. The rooms on the north side of the ground floor feature works that have been donated to the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen in recent years or that the Kunstverein St. Gallen and Kunstmuseum St. Gallen were able to acquire.

The exhibition begins with abstract formulations that initially seem devoid of all figuration and follows the traces of a painting that then allows for figuration in a basically abstract painting. Dan Christensen (*1942, Lexington, Nebraska; †2007, East Hampton, New York), Henry Codax (active since 2011), Raoul De Keyser (*1930, †2012, Deinze), Olivier Mosset (*1944, Bern), Albert Oehlen (*1954, Krefeld), and Matthias Zinn (*1964, Tegernsee) are cornerstones of this tradition of painting. It culminates in a monumental landscape, two large-scale drawings, and a sculpture by Per Kirkeby (*1938, †2018, Copenhagen), which Heiner E. Schmid donated to the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen. Classical figuration in Hans Josephsohn’s (*1920, Königsberg; †2012, Zurich) sculptures is combined with series of works by Fritz Wotruba (*1907, †1975, Vienna), one of the most important late modernist sculptors, who dissolved the figurative components in favor of geometric abstraction.

Curator: Roland Wäspe

Kunstmuseum St. Gallen


Albert Oehlen, Richard Prince et al.

Black Album / White Cube. A Journey into Art and Music (group show)
Kunsthal Rotterdam, Rotterdam
20 June 2020 – 17 January 2021

Albert Oehlen, Floor, 2007. Photo: Simon Vogel © Albert Oehlen/VG Bild-Kunst Bonn 2019
Albert Oehlen, Floor, 2007. Photo: Simon Vogel © Albert Oehlen/VG Bild-Kunst Bonn 2019

Music rules! In the exhibition Black Album / White Cube at Kunsthal Rotterdam 35 internationally renowned artists and musicians present almost 200 works of contemporary art - multimedia installations, sculptures, videos and paintings. The exhibition reveals what happens when the worlds of art and pop music meet. Modern classics – including the seminal painting by Emil Schult that became the cover of Kraftwerk’s groundbreaking album Autobahn in 1974 – will be exhibited alongside photographs by Wolfgang Tillmans and Anton Corbijn, paintings by Kim Gordon and Albert Oehlen, as well as video installations by Arthur Jafa and Cyprien Gaillard. Black Album / White Cube is a surprising journey beyond art from the 1990s until now, inspired and fueled by music from The Beatles and Joy Division to Britney Spears and Rotterdam’s own gabber techno.


Kunsthal Rotterdam


Glenn Brown, Albert Oehlen, Rebecca Warren, Christopher Wool et al.

00s. Cranford Collection: the 2000s (group show)
MO.CO., Montpellier
24 October 2020 – 4 April 2021

Image: Albert Oehlen, 3 Amigos I , 2000/2006, © Adagp, Paris, 2020
Image: Albert Oehlen, 3 Amigos I , 2000/2006, © Adagp, Paris, 2020

For the first time in France, MO.CO. presents a selection of important works from the Cranford Collection. Established by Muriel and Freddy Salem in 1999, it is now among the largest private art collections in Europe, comprising over seven hundred works from the 1960s to the present.

The exhibition 00s. The 2000s in the Cranford Collection focuses on this as yet unexplored decade, which has still to be fully defined. For this reason, the works in the exhibition will be presented chronologically. A timeline will chart the key events of this period and connect them to paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures and videos from this prestigious collection.

00s will offer a reading of the world through art (or of art through the world) with the aim of teasing out an image of a decade which remains loosely defined, and of establishing whether a coherent relationship emerges between works whose only apparent connection is the era in which they were created. By placing the emphasis on volume (with approximately one hundred exhibited artworks), the range of mediums, as well as the diversity of the artists’ ages and nationalities, the exhibition will establish a dialogue between art and topical issues, and seek to reveal how the 2000s have transformed our global cultures, geopolitics and economy, as well as our ecological awareness.

MO.CO.


Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Nur nichts anbrennen lassen. New presentation of the collection (group show)
Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn
3 June 2020 – 1 July 2022

installation view: Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, 2020. Photo: David Ertl
installation view: Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, 2020. Photo: David Ertl

After the great survey of painting in the exhibition Jetzt! Young Painting in Germany, the Kunstmuseum Bonn is now turning its attention once again to its own collection, which is being presented in a new way in its many and varied aspects, incorporating acquisitions and donations from recent years as well as permanent loans from private collections (KiCo, Mondstudio, Scharpff-Striebich, etc.).

At the same time, the re-hanging also provides a resonance space for the positions previously shown in Jetzt!, since the Kunstmuseum has defined painting as the focal point of its collection of contemporary art from the very beginning. Thus, a room with paintings from the 1980s provides a retrospective of the emphatic revitalization of painting and at the same time an outlook on current painting projects, for example Tobias Pils and his complex paintings, both reflective and intuitively developed. The spectrum ranges from Informel to Palermo, Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and to Pia Fries, Christopher Wool and Thomas Huber.

Also the pictorial possibilities of photography are discussed, with new acquisitions of photographs by Heidi Specker and Viktoria Binschtok, which were previously shown in solo exhibitions at the Kunstmuseum, and photographs by Claudia Fährenkemper and Hartmut Neumann, who donated a comprehensive body of his work to the museum. The museum also received works by Harald Naegeli, who is not presented here as a sprayer, but with his Urwolken as a creator of utopian drawing spaces.

The video centre is showing the film Unheil (disaster) by John Bock, acquired in 2018, which invents a medieval age full of disturbing rituals. Separate rooms are dedicated to Isa Genzken and Georg Herold, two artists who refuse to be tied down by any kind of media or content, Genzken confidently improvising, Herold with irreverent humour "Nur nichts anbrennen lassen" ("Just don't scorch anything").

Kunstmuseum Bonn


Albert Oehlen et al.

Writing the History of the Future (The ZKM Collection) (group show)
ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe
23 February 2019 – 8 August 2021

Das 30jährige Bestehen des ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe ist der Anlass, mit seiner Sammlung, die als eine der wichtigsten Medienkunstsammlungen der Welt gilt, die Geschichte der Kunst im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert neu zu erzählen. Mit über 500 Objekten zeigt die Ausstellung erstmals die Vielfalt der Künste im medialen Wandel. Sie umfasst Fotografie, Grafik, Malerei und Skulptur ebenso wie computerbasierte Werke, Film, Holografie, Kinetische Kunst, Op-Art, Sound Art, visuelle Poesie und Videokunst.

Das 20. Jahrhundert erlebte eine radikale Transformation des Bildes durch die apparativen Medien. Beginnend mit dem Skandal der Fotografie, der darin bestand, dass Bilder sich quasi selbst herstellen, haben die Medien den „Gesamtcharakter der Kunst verändert“ (Walter Benjamin). Fotografie, Film, Fernsehen, Video, Computer und Internet haben das Verhältnis von Künstler, Werk und Betrachter sowie unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen neu bestimmt. Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht beispielhaft den Wandel der Kunst angesichts der sich verändernden apparativen Produktions-, Rezeptions- und Distributionstechnologien deutlich. Sie zeigt auch, wie KünstlerInnen mediale und soziale Praktiken vorwegnehmen, die erst Jahre später für die gesamte Gesellschaft selbstverständlich werden. Sie schreiben, wie der Titel der Ausstellung sagt, die Geschichte der Zukunft.

Durch die alle Gattungen und Medien übergreifende Perspektive eröffnet die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future auf über 6.000 qm einen neuen Blick auf die Kunst des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts. Diese Epoche rasanten technologischen Wandels durch elektronische und digitale Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien leitete eine nie gekannte Demokratisierung von Kunst und Kultur ein. Writing the History of the Future macht nachvollziehbar, wie das Versprechen der Fotografie, die Abbildung der Welt zu individualisieren, in den 1960er-Jahren von den AktivistInnen der Videokunst nochmals eingelöst wurde. Mit der plötzlich verfügbaren Videotechnik bildeten sie Welten ab, die weder im Fernsehen noch von der Filmindustrie gezeigt wurden und entwickelten eine Ästhetik, die noch heute unsere visuelle Kultur beeinflusst. Die Erweiterung der technischen Trägermedien des Bildes, vom Tafelbild zum Bildschirm, hat die Kunst in einer neuen visuellen Kultur aufgelöst, Massenkultur und Hochkultur verschränkt. Mit der Verbreitung der Computertechnik in den 1950er-Jahren wandelte sich unsere Vorstellung des Schöpferischen, begann die Automatisierung und Algorithmisierung der Künste. Der zeichenverarbeitende Apparat provozierte Diskussionen wie sie heute im Hinblick auf die Künstliche Intelligenz aufs Neue geführt werden. Elektronische Medien veränderten auch die Wahrnehmung und die Erzeugung des Klangs im 20. Jahrhunderts. Bisher illegitime Klänge und Geräusche wurden zu einem Medium der bildenden Kunst, zur Sound Art.

Die Ausstellung Writing the History of the Future macht deutlich, wie grundlegend Apparate das Verhältnis zum Kunstwerk verändert haben – sowohl im Hinblick auf die Produktion als auch auf die Rezeption. Die Erzeugung von Kunst konzentriert sich nicht mehr allein auf das Subjekt des Künstlers bzw. der Künstlerin, sondern inkludiert diverse Aktanten, seien es Apparate oder Menschen. Durch die Entwicklung der partizipativen, interaktiven und performativen Künste, von bewegten Bildern zu den bewegten BetrachterInnen, entstehen seit den 1960er- Jahren offene Werke, welche die BesucherInnen einer Ausstellung nicht allein zum Betrachten, sondern zum Handeln auffordern.

Die Sammlungspräsentation, für die aus 9.500 Werken ausgewählt wurde, zeichnet sich durch ihre gattungsüberschreitende Inszenierung aus. Sie zeigt den Wandel der Gattung Porträt, der Darstellung des Körpers, des Landschaftsbildes und der Architektur vom Gemälde zur interaktiven Computerinstallation. Sie zeigt die Aktualisierung des Urmediums Schrift sowie der Kunst als Format des kollektiven und individuellen Gedächtnisses unter den Bedingungen der Informationstechnologie. Die Ausstellung präsentiert somit eine Kunst radikaler Zeitgenossenschaft, d.h. eine Kunst, in der KünstlerInnen die Gegenwart mit den technischen Medien ihrer Zeit reflektieren. Sie bietet eine einmalige Gelegenheit, mit zum Teil raumgreifenden Installationen und zahlreichen Inkunablen der Medienkunst, einen umfassenden Überblick über die eigentliche Entwicklung der Kunst im 20. Jahrhundert jenseits von Malerei und Skulptur zu gewinnen.

Writing the History of the Future ist nicht allein eine Sammlung von Objekten, sondern auch eine Versammlung von Subjekten. Lounges laden ein, sich zusammenzusetzen und über das Gesehene mit Freunden und Familie auszutauschen, im Ackerspace treffen sich Interessierte zu Workshops und Seminaren. Im BÄM-Lab, dem Maker-Space des ZKM wird gemeinsam experimentiert.

Die Ausstellung ist ein Erlebnis- und Denkraum, in dem das Publikum angeregt wird, an der Geschichte der Zukunft mitzuschreiben.

ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe