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Richard Prince et al.

True Pictures? Contemporary Photography From Canada and The USA (group show)
Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover
6 November 2021 – 13 February 2022

Installation view: Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover, 2021. Photo: Herling/Herling/Werner, Sprengel Museum Hannover
Installation view: Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover, 2021. Photo: Herling/Herling/Werner, Sprengel Museum Hannover

The Sprengel Museum Hannover is hosting TRUE PICTURES?, a major show that – for the first time on this scale – is presenting key developments and trends in Canadian and US photography from 1980 to the present. Among 36 artists occupying a roughly 2000 sqm space are Cindy Sherman, Walead Beshty, Carrie Mae Weems, Jeff Wall, Nan Goldin, Martine Gutierrez, Deana Lawson and Richard Prince.

At the beginning of the 20th century, North American photography was considered groundbreaking for the development of an artistic visual language for the medium. This pioneering role was largely lost due to the evolution of photography in Europe from the 1980s onwards. American photography no longer served as a model for younger artists – in this situation, awareness of it also drifted out of the spotlight. Devoted to this phenomenon, TRUE PICTURES? is showcasing works by Canadian and US artists from three generations who not only share their origins and the medium of photography, but who all also belong to the digital age. By this is meant not only the advent of digital photography in the previously analog medium, but also that no artist can ignore the challenge of engaging with digitisation and the accompanying social changes – be it in addressing the oft-cited “flood of images”, the technical possibilities offered by the medium or in deliberately dissociating from the phenomena of the “digital age”.

The three generations of artists also have experience of periods of upheaval and challenges in society as a whole and in the political arena. These range from the 1968 protests, the impact of the Vietnam War and the AIDS pandemic to racism, preoccupation with feminist theory, identity issues and the questioning of perceptions of sexuality and gender – topics that in many cases have not lost their urgency to this day. In addition to narrative and politically motivated stances, the works of the younger artists include subjective and transmedial approaches that are an expression of the visual culture of the 21st century.

Sprengel Museum


Additional:

Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Julian Schnabel et al.

THE 80s. Art of the Eighties (group show)
Albertina Modern, Vienna
10 October 2021 – 13 February 2022

Julian Schnabel, Pandora (Jaqueline as an Etruscan), 1986, Albertina, Wien – The ESSL Collection © Julian Schnabel, photo: Stefan Fiedler - Salon Iris, Vienna
Julian Schnabel, Pandora (Jaqueline as an Etruscan), 1986, Albertina, Wien – The ESSL Collection © Julian Schnabel, photo: Stefan Fiedler - Salon Iris, Vienna

A major exhibition on the 1980s at Albertina Modern bears visible witness to an era that saw artists shatter established paradigms and set off in search of expressive diversity.

1980s art seeks to overwhelm: it was an era of visual excess, individual styles, and never-ending stories. All this went hand in hand with exuberant imagery, a strong narrative urge, and an enthusiasm for the exploration of materials and new media.

Artists such as David Salle and Julian Schnabel gave rise to the painting-as-fiction. And in the oeuvres of artists like Francesco Clemente and Mimmo Paladino, eclecticism prevails across numerous works independent of time and place. One finds quotations with origins ranging from antiquity to the present that serve to accentuate the non-authentic and invest the familiar with new meaning. The central exponents of this decade—Jeff Koons, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, and Julian Schnabel—are present here alongside less-known figures well worth discovering, including Jack Goldstein, Isolde Joham, and Julia Wachtel. The quotation, the distrust of originals seen in the oeuvres of Richard Prince and Elaine Sturtevant, and the art of sampling as practiced by Gerwald Rockenschaub and David Salle show to just what extent the 1980s were indeed the most important decade of recent art history in terms of art’s subsequent path forward.

The loss of immediacy owed to a world growing more and more virtual and developing bit by bit into a media society is also reflected in an art of the simulacrum: the verisimilitude of pictures from the realms of high and low art is generally called into question, with artists such as Sherrie Levine and Cindy Sherman grappling with the phenomenon of the likeness per se and thereby inventing a second-degree reality.

Albertina Modern


Urs Fischer, Richard Prince, Rudolf Stingel et al.

Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris
22 May – 31 December 2021

Urs Fischer, Untitled (detail), 2011, © Urs Fischer, Installation view Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, 2021, © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier, photo: Stefan Altenburger
Urs Fischer, Untitled (detail), 2011, © Urs Fischer, Installation view Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, 2021, © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier, photo: Stefan Altenburger

Works by Urs Fischer and Richard Prince are included in the inaugural exhibition at the Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, which is on view from 22 May until 31 December 2021.

Urs Fischer’s installation, Untitled (2011), is presented in the Rotonda, in the monumental heart of the Bourse de Commerce. This is the first time the work has been shown in France. Fischer has redesigned Untitled to suit the scale of the space: a “public square” covered with a dome, reaching almost 40 metres in height.

Photographs from Richard Prince's Cowboy series are presented in the gallery on the first floor, along with a selection of series and ensembles from the 1970s to 1990s.

The Bourse de Commerce — Pinault Collection is the latest museum in a network of sites and initiatives developed by François Pinault since 2006. It offers a perspective on the contemporary art collection he has amassed over the last forty years, through a unique programme of exhibitions and events.

Bourse de Commerce