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Urs Fischer, Richard Prince, Rudolf Stingel et al.

Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris
22 May – 31 December 2021

Urs Fischer, Untitled (detail), 2011, © Urs Fischer, Installation view Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, 2021, © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier, photo: Stefan Altenburger
Urs Fischer, Untitled (detail), 2011, © Urs Fischer, Installation view Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, 2021, © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier, photo: Stefan Altenburger

Works by Urs Fischer and Richard Prince are included in the inaugural exhibition at the Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, which is on view from 22 May until 31 December 2021.

Urs Fischer’s installation, Untitled (2011), is presented in the Rotonda, in the monumental heart of the Bourse de Commerce. This is the first time the work has been shown in France. Fischer has redesigned Untitled to suit the scale of the space: a “public square” covered with a dome, reaching almost 40 metres in height.

Photographs from Richard Prince's Cowboy series are presented in the gallery on the first floor, along with a selection of series and ensembles from the 1970s to 1990s.

The Bourse de Commerce — Pinault Collection is the latest museum in a network of sites and initiatives developed by François Pinault since 2006. It offers a perspective on the contemporary art collection he has amassed over the last forty years, through a unique programme of exhibitions and events.

Bourse de Commerce


Additional:

Richard Prince et al.

True Pictures? Contemporary Photography From Canada and The USA (group show)
Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover
6 November 2021 – 13 February 2022

Installation view: Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover, 2021. Photo: Herling/Herling/Werner, Sprengel Museum Hannover
Installation view: Sprengel Museum Hannover, Hanover, 2021. Photo: Herling/Herling/Werner, Sprengel Museum Hannover

The Sprengel Museum Hannover is hosting TRUE PICTURES?, a major show that – for the first time on this scale – is presenting key developments and trends in Canadian and US photography from 1980 to the present. Among 36 artists occupying a roughly 2000 sqm space are Cindy Sherman, Walead Beshty, Carrie Mae Weems, Jeff Wall, Nan Goldin, Martine Gutierrez, Deana Lawson and Richard Prince.

At the beginning of the 20th century, North American photography was considered groundbreaking for the development of an artistic visual language for the medium. This pioneering role was largely lost due to the evolution of photography in Europe from the 1980s onwards. American photography no longer served as a model for younger artists – in this situation, awareness of it also drifted out of the spotlight. Devoted to this phenomenon, TRUE PICTURES? is showcasing works by Canadian and US artists from three generations who not only share their origins and the medium of photography, but who all also belong to the digital age. By this is meant not only the advent of digital photography in the previously analog medium, but also that no artist can ignore the challenge of engaging with digitisation and the accompanying social changes – be it in addressing the oft-cited “flood of images”, the technical possibilities offered by the medium or in deliberately dissociating from the phenomena of the “digital age”.

The three generations of artists also have experience of periods of upheaval and challenges in society as a whole and in the political arena. These range from the 1968 protests, the impact of the Vietnam War and the AIDS pandemic to racism, preoccupation with feminist theory, identity issues and the questioning of perceptions of sexuality and gender – topics that in many cases have not lost their urgency to this day. In addition to narrative and politically motivated stances, the works of the younger artists include subjective and transmedial approaches that are an expression of the visual culture of the 21st century.

Sprengel Museum


Urs Fischer

Lovers
Museo Jumex, Mexico City
2 April – 18 September 2022

Image: Urs Fischer, Noisette, 2009, photo: Stefan Altenburger, © Urs Fischer, courtesy of the artist
Image: Urs Fischer, Noisette, 2009, photo: Stefan Altenburger, © Urs Fischer, courtesy of the artist

Urs Fischer: Lovers is a 20-year survey of Swiss-born conceptual artist. The exhibition is the first major presentation of Urs Fischer’s work in Mexico and will bring together works from international public and private collections and the artist’s own archive, alongside new pieces made for the museum. Together, they exhibit the wide-ranging creativity, humor, and depth of the artist’s practice.

Museo Jumex


Urs Fischer et al.

Anti-Structure (group show)
DESTE Foundation, Athens
2 June – 27 October 2021

Installation view: DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art, Athens, photo: George Sfakianakis
Installation view: DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art, Athens, photo: George Sfakianakis

Taking as its starting point an immersive installation with works by Urs Fischer and placing it in dialogue with the work of twenty-one Greek and Cypriot artists of various generations and modalities, Anti-Structure explores the far-fetched realm of fine lines between order and chaos, stasis and flux, structure and fragility.

Coined in 1969 by cultural anthropologist Victor Turner (1920–1983), “anti-structure” is a study of the state of mental and spiritual limbo that is characteristic of the second stage—the liminal stage—of any rite of passage, when the novitiate is neither here nor there but, betwixt and between, remains enveloped in abiding upheaval and disarray and a preternatural void.  Anti-structure thus describes a stage of perpetual transformation characterized by moments of dissolution where “structural hierarchies are flattened or inverted.” Whereas the dominant ideology du jour was that any such breakdown would result in anomie and angst, Turner recognized that in times of great happenstance, culture in fact reboots itself and new symbols, models, and paradigms arise.

It is not unusual to find such pockets of clandestine novelty simmering deep in the underground, the pregnant margins of normative order. It is in these lands of strangers and exiles, that one finds fertile ground for radical thought and very strange ideas. It is these ideas cultivated in the fringes of institutionalized etiquette that bring forth novel ways of dress, posture, and expression, attitudes that when fully formed feed back into the system to either break or make the mainstream.

DESTE Foundation


Urs Fischer

8, 2014
installed in the new extension of the Kunsthaus Zürich

Image: Urs Fischer, 8, 2014, photo: © Juliet Haller, Amt für Stadtebau, ZürichWerk, © Urs Fischer
Image: Urs Fischer, 8, 2014, photo: © Juliet Haller, Amt für Stadtebau, ZürichWerk, © Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer's sculpture 8 from 2014 has been installed in the new Chipperfield Building at the Kunsthaus Zürich. The official inauguration of the new extension is scheduled to take place on 9 October 2021.

Kunsthaus Zürich


Urs Fischer et al.

The Paradox of Stillness: Art, Object, and Performance (group show)
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
15 May – 8 August 2021

Presenting works from the early 20th century to today, The Paradox of Stillness: Art, Object, and Performance examines the notion of stillness as both a performative and visual gesture. This major Walker-organized exhibition features pieces by an international roster of artists testing the boundaries between stillness and motion, mortality and aliveness, the still life and the living picture.

Stillness and permanence are common qualities of painting and sculpture. Consider, for example, the frozen gestures of a historical tableau, the timelessness of a still life painting, or the unyielding bronze or marble figure. Translating these traditional mediums into actions, artists use performance to investigate the interplay between the fixed image and the live body.

The Paradox of Stillness showcases more than 100 works by some 65 artists, including up to 15 live performances activated in the Walker’s galleries or public spaces at intervals throughout the presentation. Works on view range from object-based art and pictures that subtly come to life or shift outside the frame to actions staged by live performers that slowly unfold or unexpectedly reappear. Across the exhibition, puppets and automatons dance through space, while burning candles and rotting fruit mark time’s passing.

Walker Art Center